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Spitfire only parts brings together all the Spitfire parts from the other pages on the website. Many parts of the Spitfire were generic parts i.e. used in other aircraft types and these will be found in the pages listed above.

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Compass and Clocks

Page 5 Instruments

Compasses and Clocks in the main are generic instruments and used across the range of aircraft. The aircraft shown in the adds were fitted with the particular part shown but as generic parts were used in other aircraft. Fighters  usually use different instruments than the ones fitted in Bombers and other heavy aircraft.

Use the links under to navigate the instrument pages

Page 1 Instruments home.  Page 2 Airspeed indicators.    Page 3 Altimeters.    Page four Boost gauges.    Page five Clocks and compasses. Page Six Climb and descend.          Page 7 Directional indicators  

  Page 8 Fuel gauges    Page 9 Flap Indicators  Page 10 Brake Gauges   Page 11 Oxygen gauges  Page 12 Pressure gauges   Page13 Revolution Counters   Page 14 temperature gauges

  Page 15 Turn and slip and artificial Horizon  Page 16 Undercarriage indicators  Page 17 Trim gauges  Page 18 Volt and Ammeter

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Air Ministry 8 Day clock (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 1)

This is a classic  8 day clock used predominately in RAF WWII fighter aircraft including the Spitfire.

 Practically all of these clocks either do not work or run intermittently however this one has been serviced having run it so far for 5 days its get perfect time so sold as in good working order.

Seen above in situ in the Spitfitre Cockpit.

£275

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

B17 Master compass auto pilot (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 2)

This is a master compass from a B17 this compass was part of the autopilot system and was mounted in the wing of the aircraft. Purchased on our trip to Arnhem this was probably from a B17 shot down on its Bombing mission to Germany although unfortunately the specific history of this particular piece has been lost. It is in original condition but the glass is broken see the pictures.

AN5751-1

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Follow this link to find a servo relating to the B17 auto pilot system.

 

More information about this compass and the B17 auto pilot system can be found here.

£225

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Original Boxed WWI RFC MK II 259 Compass (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 4)

This compass is a superb and extremely rare piece complete in its original box which carries the same serial number as the compass. This is the aircraft version of the  Mk II 259 Compass.

Serial number  1219

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

It is in stunning condition and works perfectly in addition it still has its original light fitting with original wire attached. It has the majority of its original paint and fluid everything about this compass is A1.

The MK II 259 compass was used in a wide variety of WWI RFC aircraft including the Sopwith Camel shown under

Under seen in situ in a Camel cockpit

£3250

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

The translation of the plate is roughly as follows:
"Compass (-best quality?)
Number 9918
Date Aug 1940"
Thank you to William for translating this for me

1940 dated Japanese aircraft compass (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 5)

Superb example of a Japanese wartime compass used in a wide variety of the their aircraft during WWII. Japanese instruments are the most difficult to find and rarest of all the combatants of WWII. This is the first Japanese made instrument to appear on this site since it was created. In excellent condition it still retains its fluid.

Under are a couple examples of the aircraft it was fitted to although I understand it was fitted to at least six or seven aircraft types.

Compass shown mounted on top of the panel of a Mitsubishi Ki-57 Topsy

Seen mounted middle left in the panel of a  Koken Long Range Mono-Plane

£899

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

Wartime Japanese compass (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 6A)

Here is another Japanese compass although not in quite good condition.

The ring inside is there but the fluid has become cloudy and the base is missing. The paint has rubbed off to expose a solid brass case.

 This is unusual in that it was found in Holland probably brought back as a war souvenir from a crashed aircraft which would explain the condition and the missing base.

Its the same design as the one shown above

 

£495

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

Lancaster P4 Compass (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 6)

A Nice P4 compass as used in the Lancaster and other heavy bombers. It is in good used condition.

 Some paint loss and made of solid brass so lends itself to be stripped and polished.

Air Ministry Ref: 6A/745

Type P4A

£155

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

 RCAF Type P8 Compass (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 59)

Here we have a RCAF Type P8 Compass

It is in a Very Good Condition however it has painted Gold

It Carries the Air Ministry Reference Number 6A/0726

This was used by the RCAF denoted by the 0 in the Reference Number

It Comes in its Original Box with Inspection Stamps on the Inside Lid one of which is dated 1940

£195

 

Type 0.6 Compass (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 7)

This is a hand held compass used for taking a bearing in wartime aircraft when the fixed type compass was faulty or difficult to read. They are illuminated and batteries are located in the stalk. This compass is solid brass and in good used condition.. I have not tested it so sold as a collectable.

 

£125

 

 COMPASS CARD holder for the Spitfire Main panel. This is the bit that's everybody's missing. These are totally original new old stock fitted to nearly every type of wartime RAF aircraft.

Original Compass Card Holder (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 9)

£55

Re printed compass cards available £5 each free post (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 10)

£5

1930s Compass card holder (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 11)

New old stock original anodised compass card holder used in 1930s RAF aircraft that did not fly at night for example the Hawker Bi Planes.

£55

 

P11 Compass  (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 12)

This is in a good overall condition however it has lost its fluid

Type P.11

Ref: 6A/1672

Service Date 1944

Used in Aircraft Such as the Hurricane as well as other RAF Aircraft

£155

A band of American flyers under the command of Lieutenant Colonel James Doolittle dared the impossible by flying their B-25 medium bombers from the deck of the USS Hornet to avenge the attack on Pearl Harbour by bombing selected cities on the Japanese home islands.

 

A-3/Navy Mark 3 Giro Control (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 13)

 Found in most C-47, C-46, B-25 and PV-2s, used in conjunction with the model A3 autopilot.

 

Seen in situ above in a B25.

£95

Dated 1942

£225

Air position indicator (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 15)

API is an air position indicator.  You set the North and East as the aircraft’s initial position or from a fix point.  The True Course is the aircrafts magnetic heading offset using the VSC – variation setting control – to get a True Heading or True Course.  A feed is the aircraft’s airspeed corrected for temperature and height.  This then gives a position of where the aircraft would be assuming no wind.  As there is usually wind the position is its air position. Comparing the given air position with an updated fix we can calculate the wind over the previous period.

 

Doppler (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 16)

Used as a navigation aid in heavy bombers

Type AA 5605-1

Service Date 1969

£55

Lancaster instrument panel bracket (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 17)

Seen left new made exact replicas of the bracket which held the DR Compass and LR homing indicator see this on the Panel page link

Chipmunk Compass mount (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 18)

This is a nice complete compass mount from a chipmunk, has the compass corrector attached and a light all ion very good condition. This compass mount  will fit a P8 or P11compass.

The Chippy was the RAF's standard trainer from the mid 50s. It remained in service with the Army Air Corps until 1997. Nearly 500 are still flying. The first aircraft were designed by De Havilland of Canada (and was the first indigenous design of that company since its formation in 1928), intending to replace the Tiger Moth biplane trainer. It first flew on 22. May 1946 from De Haviland's factory at Downsview, Toronto. It was designed by Wsiewolod J. Jakimuik, formerly chief designer with PZL of Poland. It was ordered by the Canadian Air Force, who used it as an  trainer, prior to students graduating to the Harvard. Canadian Chipmunks were exported to Egypt, Lebanon and Thailand.

Out of Stock More Wanted Contact Us

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

RAF ASR/MTB Compass and binnacle (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 19)

This is a nice original compass and binnacle fitted to the air sea rescue launches used to save downed airmen in the channel and Motor torpedo boast of the Royal navy. It has its original paint but is completely made of brass and could be stripped and polished.

ASR launch

During the Second World War, flotillas of the Royal Navy's Motor Torpedo Boats and other coastal forces fought a deadly war for control of the English Channel and the North Sea. These small, fast boats attacked enemy convoys, escorted freighters, landed secret agents and even raided enemy ports. Unsung heroes, these craft and their tiny crews helped stave off defeat in the dark days of 1940. The same vessels then took the fight to other waters, and by the end of the war, British MTB's had seen service in the Mediterranean, the Baltic and the Far East.

MTB

£399

 

Repeater Compass (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 20)

This is a very interesting early part. Fitted commonly to Lancaster's although this was used long before Lancaster's became operational. This part says fitted NEW to RF 322 (this would appear to be the aircraft serial number)   9/11/1940. Repeater No-1A  (For auto controls) The knob has been changed at some time as its dated 1943. It also has a later date of 1947 so it would appear its been used throughout the War. Could have been fitted to a Hampton or Wellington or other early RAF aircraft. Glass is cracked easy to replace otherwise in great condition and worthy of further research.

RF322 is  a Lancaster III Built in 1945. It was in Costal Command Service Until 11 July 1957 when it was sold for scrap

It Served with 279, 38,37 and 621 ASR Squadrons

£75

 

The Junkers JU 88 was one of the most versatile and effective combat aircraft of World War II.  The German aircraft was  slow, but nevertheless very effective. 14676 were built, including a staggering 104 prototypes for its 60 different versions.

BF 110/ JU87 Compass (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 21)

This is a WW2 OK 38 German bomber compass as used on ME110, JU87 ect.

Type FL23234

Werk Nr: Q-20091

Bakelite body made by Ludolph, 

Alloy front face good condition working order fluid has been drained.

£375

This compass was purchased on our trip to Arnhem.

Click on the picture's to enlarge them.

Luftwaffe PKZ 14 auto pilot giro (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 26)

Click on the picture's to enlarge them.

This is the internal remains of a PKZ giro compass used as part of the auto pilot system.  The PKZ became available  in 1942 and was produced in large numbers. It was used in a variety of German aircraft including the AR 234, Do 335, He 218, JU 288 and JU 388. You can read more about this unit here link  Identification kindly supplied by Remco Caspers.

Ref: FL32113-6

Shown above the AR 234 The Arado Ar 234 B Blitz (Lightning) was the world's first operational jet bomber and reconnaissance aircraft. The first Ar 234 combat mission, a reconnaissance flight over the Allied beachhead in Normandy, took place August 2, 1944. With a maximum speed of 735 kilometers (459 miles) per hour, the Blitz easily eluded Allied piston-engine fighters. While less famous than the Messerschmitt Me 262 jet fighters, the Ar 234s that reached Luftwaffe units provided excellent service, especially as reconnaissance aircraft

Click on the picture's to enlarge them.

£199

Luftwaffe Clock  (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 28)

 

Luftwaffe Clock (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 28)

This clock is complete although  not working it has its original dust cover in place as seen in the photo

£299

£95

Watch Holder Mk I White (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 30)

Old new stock mint condition rubber Mk I watch holder.

Used in Lancasters and other RAF heavy Bombers.

White

Air Ministry Marked

Ref: 6A/269

Metal MK II Watch Holder (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 31)

These are exact copies of the metal watch holders used in 1930s RAF aircraft complete with soft backing material.

£125

P8 Spitfire compass and tray  (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 38)

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

This compass is not in great condition see the pictures, but comes complete with compass corrector and mounted in a compass tray although this is not a Spitfire compass tray and is from an unknown aircraft type.

Air Ministry Marked 6A/726

Type P.8.M

Compass Corrector Ref:6B/1752

 

 

£175

 

P10 Compass  (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 39)

The top is missing from this compass and there is no fluid

Used in the Lancaster and Halifax Heavy Bombers.

Ref: 6A/1671

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

£110

 

Repeater Compass (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 42)

. Fitted commonly to Lancaster's although this was used long before Lancaster's became operational.

It Could have been fitted to a Hampton or Wellington or other early RAF aircraft.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

£85

 

Repeater Compass (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 43)

. Fitted commonly to Lancaster's although this was used long before Lancaster's became operational.

It Could have been fitted to a Hampton or Wellington or other early RAF aircraft.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Reference 6B/1584

Dated 1943

£85

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

£185

P4 compass  (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 44)

Fitted most commonly to Spitfires this compass is in its original box and in good condition but is dry and has no fluid.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

This compass appears to have been heavily used between January 1942 and April 1942 as it has three service stamps 25th January 24,  21st February 1942 and  25th April 1942 these dates imply that it was most likely to have been fitted to a MK V Spitfire.

The difficult task of slowly grinding down the Germans continued into 1942 and 1943. Squadrons also found themselves on tiring defensive patrols as small formations of FW-190s started to fly 'hit and run' nuisance raids all along the South Coast.

By the autumn of 1942, the arrival of the USAAF and its daylight bombers would add bomber escort to Fighter Command's tasks. Until American P47 Thunderbolt fighter groups were operational in May 1943, the Command's Spitfires performed a vital role in protecting the increasing numbers of B 17 Flying fortresses and B4 Liberators operating over Occupied Europe. The Spitfire's chronic lack of operational range however meant such protection was limited to the Channel and the European coast.

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Spitfire compass tray (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 45)

Now available exact replicas of the Spitfire compass tray, this is a very difficult piece to replicate these are perfect copies made using original drawings they will be supplied painted in a black finish.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

£450

Repeater Compass (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 46)

. Fitted commonly to Lancaster's although this was used long before Lancaster's became operational.  Could have been fitted to a Hampton or Wellington or other early RAF aircraft.

 Glass is missing but in very good condition.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Ref: 6A/1584

Dated 1942

£75

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

B17 Bendix master indicator giro flux Compass (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 47)

Used in the B17 and other American WWII bombers

 The Gyro Flux Gate Compass, was a revolutionary type which enables Allied airmen to fly straight to their target under virtually any conditions, return just as unerringly to their bases after showering destruction on enemy objectives.

The flux gate, or magnetic azimuth sensitive element of the system (magnetic azimuth is direction with relation to magnetic north) is fully electrical and is maintained at the horizontal by an electrically driven horizon gyro. Because of this arrangement, the compass system's indications are not appreciably affected by the sudden manoeuvres in flight. A stable compass proves its worth to airmen who dive, turn their planes at 300-400 mph.

The device will not go off its reading when the plane dives or climbs suddenly, and as Reichel describes it, "will not lag or overshoot during a turn and will not oscillate or 'hunt' back and forth in rough weather."

One of the compass problems arising from use of aircraft equipped with armament, armour plate and laden with bombs has been solved with the remote indicating phase of the system. The magnetic azimuth sensitive element, or transmitter, is placed where interference will be at a minimum — that is, at a point remote from current carrying conductors or causes of local magnetic deviations such as armament, which would impair the accuracy of the standard compass.

Through this arrangement, the indications of the transmitter in its out-of-the-way place are registered on the master indicator. Further, other indicators are linked to the compass through the Magnesyn system, which makes possible remote readings of measurements received from a master source. Pilot, co-pilot navigator and bombardier have their own dials, and compass readings are transmitted to them or to as many as six different points about the aircraft.

£175

Compass corrector (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 48)

 Compass corrector, bolted to the underside of the compass tray in practically all RAF Wartime aircraft.

AM Ref: 6A/1032

£35

Currently out of Stock

Compass corrector  (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 49)

 Compass corrector, bolted to the underside of the compass tray in practically all RAF Wartime aircraft.

Ref:6A/1752

£35

 

USAAF Airpath Compass  (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 51)

 Here we have a Airpath Compass as Used by the USAAF

The Compass Inside the Case has come slightly off its stand and as a result it is at an angle

£55

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

WW2 Military Stop Watch  (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 52)

 Here we have a WW2 Stopwatch with a War Department Crows Foot and S.4494 Stamped on the Back

It has a Cuprel, Dennison Watch Case Company, Made in England Stamped on the Inside of the Case

The Movement is Clean and is in Working Condition

It has a Switch on the Side with Sections Marked Stop and Go

Out of stock more wanted contact me

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

 

Repeater Compass (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 54)

. Fitted commonly to Lancaster's although this was used long before Lancaster's became operational.  Could have been fitted to a Hampton or Wellington or other early RAF aircraft.

 Glass is broken

Ref: 6B/1584

Dated 1951

£75

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

 

Repeater Compass (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 55)

. Fitted commonly to Lancaster's although this was used long before Lancaster's became operational.  Could have been fitted to a Hampton or Wellington or other early RAF aircraft.

 Glass is broken

Ref: 6B/1584

Dated 1951

£75

Luftwaffe Clock 2 (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 56)

Luftwaffe Clock 2 (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 56)

This clock looks almost complete although  not working

One of the Hands is Missing and it has no Dust Cover

£289

£75

Variation Setting Controller for DR Compass (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 57)

Here we have a Variation Setting Controller that was used with the Distant Reading Compass System

It Carries the Reference Number 6B/1056 and is Dated 1943

The Knob turns but it does not move the Dial

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

 G.M Compass Type 4F(Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 58)

Here we have a G.M Compass Type 4F Gyro Unit type B

It Carries the Reference Number 6B/563

The Case is Lose as the Screws are Missing from the Back

£75

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

Type A-12 Army Air Force Sextant (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 60)

Here we have a Type A-12 Bubble Sextant as used by the Army Air Force

The Sextant is in its Original Box and is in an OK Condition

A pre World War II sextant manufactured by the Link Aviation Co. It was used by the military and airlines until sometime in the 1940’s, and was the last of a line of aircraft sextants whose design was influenced by use in open cockpit airplanes.

Celestial altitudes are measured by reference to an artificial bubble horizon. The bubble is electrically lighted for night use by standard C size batteries. The sextant is very unique in that it has two different optical paths that can be used. In one, the observer looks down into the sextant and sees the reflected image of the star overhead. We suspect this is the mode designed for open cockpits. In the other mode, the observer holds the sextant at arm’s length and sees the bubble reflected on a glass surface as an illuminated ring against the night sky. Readings are taken from a vernier scale.

£295

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

P4 Heavy Bomber compass  (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 61)

Here we have a P4 compass as used in the Lancaster and other heavy WWII RAF bombers.

 Although similar in appearance these are approximately 20% larger than the P8 fighter type.

£195

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

Mk III A Smiths 8 day clock  (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 62)

This is the classic early Air Ministry Smiths 8 day clock fitted in early Spitfire and Hurricanes along with other wartime and pre war RAF aircraft. Mounted in a wooden stand it is sold as non working although when shaken will tick for a few seconds.

Dated 1937

Seen above fitted in a MK V Spitfire

£325

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

 

 

A picture of the original advert from the 1933 catalogue.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

£795

1933 A T Speedometer Co Ltd 8 day clock fitted to 1930s Bentley' Blowers  (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 63)

Here is an 8 day clock made by A T Speedometer co ltd of W6 London it is mounted in a an alloy ring about 16mm thick .

The clock is 100 mm in diameter. Sadly it no longer works although the hands still turn when the knob on the back is twisted. This was an extremely high quality piece costing £3 in 1933. 

The A.T  Speedometer Company Ltd of 140 Long Acre, London WC was advertising in "Flight" magazine in July 1915 so they are one of the originals in automotive, motorcycle and aviation instrumentation.

From the early 1920s AT instruments were fitted to many prestige vintage cars, including Rolls Royce, Bentley and Frazer Nash. By then, manufacture of AT instruments had moved to West London and from October 1924 to 20 Avonmore Rd, London W14 (pg. 36, Motorsport, October 1924)

Shown above the Supercharged Bentley Blower


AT had German parentage (instrument manufacturers Deuta-Werke GmbH, Berlin) and under the newly formed Trading with the Enemy Act of 1914 company assets were confiscated at the outbreak of war.

 Ownership passed to Smiths, then to S.D Mckellen in 1920, and to Jaeger in December 1928 who in October the previous year had been bought by Smiths.

 In 1930 manufacture of AT instruments moved to the newly built Chronos Works. (pg. 82, James Nye's new book 'A Long Time in Making; History of Smiths' and pg. 42-44, 'Roadcraft' magazine published by Smiths for the 1937 London Olympia Motor Show).


In 1931 Bentley Motors went into liquidation and was acquired by Rolls Royce. Two years later the first Rolls Royce made Bentley car (3 1/2 Litre saloon) went on sale.  So in 1933 it is the model of car that is new not the fitting of AT instruments to Bentley cars; this had happened ten years earlier.


Seen above fitted in the famous Supercharged Bentley Blower

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

 

1930's Smiths Clock 160.923 (Pg 5 Compasses and Clocks 64)

Here we have a vintage smiths clock with a diameter of 85mm. It is sold as non working although it does tick for a few seconds after being shaken it appears to have been over wound. Believed to date from the 1930s.

£40

 

 

Use the links under to navigate the instrument pages

Page 1 Instruments home.  Page 2 Airspeed indicators.    Page 3 Altimeters.    Page four Boost gauges.    Page five Clocks and compasses.

Page Six Climb and descend.          Page 7 Directional indicators     Page 8 Fuel gauges    Page 9 Flap Indicators  Page 10 Brake Gauges

Page 11 Oxygen gauges  Page 12 Pressure gauges   Page13 Revolution Counters   Page 14 temperature gauges     Page 15 Turn and slip and artificial Horizon

Page 16 Undercarriage indicators  Page 17 Trim gauges  Page 18 Volt and Ammeter

 

 


       

 


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