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Welcome to the power plant section.  Please be sure to check this section on a regular basis as new products are added weekly.

Engine manuals both WWI and WWII available on the Manuals page

1 

More Engine Parts can be Found on the Relics Page

 

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Spitfire MK IX Merlin 66 reduction gear cover (pg1 Pwr)

Here is an original Merlin reduction gear cover and propeller pitch control unit.

The pitch control unit has some damage on one end but the main casting is in good condition and has no cracks or damage are visable. This piece was recovered from Arnhem Holland.

Clearly seen in situ under on a Rolls Royce Merlin.

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M 66 denotes this is from a Merlin 66 engine which powered the Spitfire MK IX

Out of stock more wanted contact me

Contact us for an overseas shipping quote

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 Mk.1 Spitfire BTH Type AS-3 Starting Magneto (pg1 Pwr)

Here is an original Starting Magneto. This magneto was removed from a Mk.1 Spitfire

They were also used early engines such as the Genet Major

British Thomson-Houston (BTH) was a British engineering and heavy industrial company, based at Rugby, Warwickshire, England and founded as a subsidiary of the General Electric Company (GE) of Schenectady, New York USA. They were known primarily for their electrical systems and steam turbines.

£699

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Spitfire Merlin Brass Oil separator (pg1 Pwr)

This piece is made from solid brass and fitted to the firewall of the Spitfire in used condition and dirty but should be serviceable after a good clean.

This is an oil separator that is installed on the output plumbing of a vacuum pump. It is intended to collect oil vapour from the vacuum pump and return it to the engine interior. Stops loss of oil and smearing of aircraft with oil vapour.

Seen in situ above mounted on the Spitfire firewall

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3 available in similar condition.

£155

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£1200

Rolls Royce Griffon Header tank (pg1 Pwr)

Here is an original Griffon header tank in excellent condition it looks to be fully serviceable subject to the required checks.

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Seen above the header tank in situ in a Spitfire this tank was removed from an Avro Shackleton

 

Above the Avro Shackleton

The successor of the great Merlin engine, the Rolls-Royce Griffon played its part in helping to win the Second World War when it was fitted to iconic warbirds such as the Spitfire and Seafire.

Griffon development began in response to a request from the Fleet Air Arm of the Royal Navy in 1938. Navy aircraft tend to be larger and heavier than their land-based counterparts; this obviously puts greater demands on the engine if performance is to be maintained.

To meet this demand, Rolls-Royce went back to the concept of the Schneider Air Racing Trophy “R” engine.

The Griffon, essentially a modernized Merlin, is a 60 degree V-12 with 2239 cu. in. displacement (the same parameters as the “R” and 36% greater displacement than the Merlin while having an only slightly larger frontal area.)

However, this was a totally new engine, featuring many design updates and improvements over the Merlin.

Overseas buyers please contact me for a shipping quote

 

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Out of stock more wanted contact me

Engraved Merlin Piston (pg1 Pwr)

Here is an original Merlin piston these were converted to ash trays during the war to raise funds for the war effort.  I has engraved on it

Made from a Rolls Royce Merlin Piston as used in the Battle of Britain August to October 1940 and Sir Winston Churchill's immortal words

 Never in the field of human conflict was so much owned by so many to so few.

It also carries an engraved copy of Sir Winston Churchill's signature. This particular one has been mounted on a wooden plaque with a catch which allows it to be hung on a wall.

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Merlin Con Rod (pg1 Pwr)

Here is an original Merlin con rod I have others available.

£155

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Pratt and Whitney Twin Wasp R-1830 Piston (Pg1 Pwr)

Here we have a piston from a Pratt and Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp engine the piston measures 5 1/2 Inches in diameter and was recovered from Holland from an unidentified crash sight. It has part of the con rod still stuck in it. It has been polished and treated with clear coat to preserve it.

The Pratt & Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp was an American aircraft engine widely used in the 1930s and 1940s. Produced by Pratt & Whitney, it was a two-row, 14-cylinder, air-cooled radial design. It displaced 1,830 cu in (30.0 L) and its bore and stroke were both 5.5 in (140 mm). A total of 173,618 R-1830 engines were built, and from their use in two of the most-produced aircraft ever built, the four-engine B-24 heavy bomber and twin-engine DC-3 transport, more Twin Wasps may have been built than any other aviation piston engine in history.

Here is a list of just a few of the aircraft both American and British that this engine was fitted to

Vickers Wellington IV

           Bristol BeaufortConsolidated B-24 Liberator. Consolidated PBY Catalina. Curtiss P-36 Hawk. Douglas C-47 Skytrain. Grumman F4F Wildcat. Short Sunderland V.               

£150

B24 Liberator Engine Mount (pg1 Pwr)

This is an engine mount from a B24 Liberator in good restored condition . This mount was purchased from an aircraft fitter who removed it from a Liberator based at Dunkeswell in Devon England. It is a superb piece in its own right but has the additional historical interest of having seen active service at Dunkeswell.

The US Army's 479th Antisubmarine Group was based at Station 173, Dunkeswell, Devon, which had been designated as FAW-7's new home in England.

The primary mission area for VB-103 and its sister squadrons in FAW-7, VB-105 and VB-110, was the Bay of Biscay. German U-Boat bases were located at Brest, Lorient, St. Nazaire, La Rochelle, and Bordeaux on the French coast, and from there the U-Boats fanned out north, west, and south in search of their prey.  To counter Allied ASW assets in the area, the Luftwaffe's V/KG40, equipped with the powerful Ju88C-6 heavy fighter, ranged across the Bay of Biscay from Bordeaux-Mérignac, and accounted for many Liberator disappearances. Several Ju88s were claimed by FAW-7 gunners in the bloody air battles between them and the Liberators.

 

Joseph Patrick Kennedy (pictured above) was the elder brother of President John F. Kennedy, and was born on the 28th July 1915.  He completed his flight training at Jacksonville U.S.A. in 1942.  As a volunteer U.S. Navy pilot he flew Mariner flying boats from Puerto Rico, Central America, before converting to the B24 Liberator and serving in England at Dunkeswell, Devon, with Squadron VB110.  After completing his normal combat tour of 30 missions, he volunteered for an extra 10 - somehow managing to talk his crew in to flying with him.  Just before his last mission Lt Kennedy volunteered for one further final mission which involved low level flying and a parachute jump.  This mission was to be Top Secret as part of project Anvil, the target being the German V3 Supergun site at Mimoyecques, France.  The details of this mission remained secret until 1966, although the identity of the crew was not released until 1970.

Contact us for shipping enquiries

£1499

Joseph P. Kennedy Jr, the oldest child of Joseph and Rose Kennedy, died on 12 August 1944, flying an experimental drone aircraft.

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The Joseph Patrick Kennedy drone Engine part (pg1 Pwr)

This piece is from a Pratt and Whitney Twin Wasp R-1830 Fitted to a Liberator. This piece was recovered from Deadmans Covert in Suffolk England.

Point A is Blythburgh where the aircraft blew up and point B is where the piece was recovered. By Road it is a distance of about 1.5 miles but as the crow fly's  considerably less.

 Whilst I cannot say as a 100% certainty that this was from Kennedys B24 Drone the fact that it is from a B24 Engine piece and the location evidence is extremely strong and as far as my research goes I can say with confidence that no other B24s went down in this location.

Top Secret telegram to General Carl Andrew Spaatz from General Jimmy Doolittle, August 1944 reporting the failure of the mission:

ATTEMPTED FIRST APHRODITE ATTACK TWELVE AUGUST WITH ROBOT TAKING OFF FROM FERSFIELD AT ONE EIGHT ZERO FIVE HOURS PD ROBOT EXPLODED IN THE AIR AT APPROXIMATELY TWO THOUSAND FEET EIGHT MILES SOUTHEAST OF HALESWORTH AT ONE EIGHT TWO ZERO HOURS PD WILFORD J. WILLY CMA SR GRADE LIEUTENANT AND JOSEPH P. KENNEDY SR GRADE LIEUTENANT CMA BOTH USNR CMA WERE KILLED PD COMMANDER SMITH CMA IN COMMAND OF THIS UNIT CMA IS MAKING FULL REPORT TO US NAVAL OPERATIONS PD A MORE DETAILED REPORT WILL BE FORWARDED TO YOU WHEN INTERROGATION IS COMPLETED

On 13th June 1944 the Nazis had begun firing the first of their Vergeltungswaffen (“retaliatory” “reprisal” ) weapons at England. The V1 pilotless jet aircraft was a relatively crude affair but Allied intelligence was aware that more sophisticated rocket weapons were also under development, designated the V2. A number of the launch sites had been identified in occupied France and it was a priority programme of the heavy bombers to put them out of action. The Allies were not aware that there was a third Vergeltungswaffen weapon under secret development – the V3 pump gun.

It was fortuitous therefore that Allied reconnaissance had identified the site of the V3 gun in northern France, even though they believed at the time that it was a V2 launch site. It was placed on the priority target list in any event.

The Mimoyecques site had already been attacked by RAF Bomber Command but such was the concern about the potential threat posed by the V2 that it was decided that further attacks were needed, in an attempt to completely obliterate it. It was now decided to use one of the Allied secret weapons in order to attack the site with a massive explosive force.

Under development were early ‘drones’ – pilotless aircraft. At this stage all that the Allies were developing were remotely controlled conventional aircraft. The remote control only operated once the aircraft was in the air – so pilots were needed to get them airborne. They then had to parachute out of what was effectively a flying bomb – ‘the Baby’ under the control of other – ‘Mother’ – aircraft flying alongside.

Experienced volunteer pilots were needed for what was a dangerous experiment. Joseph P. Kennedy Jr was a US Navy pilot who had been flying the B-24 Liberator in anti U-boat operations from England.

Lt. McCarthy of the 8th Combat Camera Unit was an eye witness in a US Mosquito aircraft monitoring the experimental flight:

the Baby just exploded in mid-air as we neared it and I was knocked halfway back to the cockpit. A few pieces of the Baby came through the plexi glass nose and I got hit in the head and caught a lot of fragments in my right arm. I crawled back to the cockpit and lowered the wheels so that Bob could make a quick emergency landing.

Although officially no explanation for the explosion was ever recorded a documentary that I watched came to the conclusion that a switch in the aircraft shorted possibly static  setting off the explosives.

Joe's squadron, flying in the bitter winter over the Bay of Biscay, suffered heavy casualties, and by the time Joe had completed his designated number of missions in May, he had lost his former co-pilot and a number of close friends.

“Joe refused his proffered leave and persuaded his crew to stay on for D-day. They flew frequently during June and July, and at the end of July they were given another opportunity to go home. He felt it unfair to ask his crew to stay on longer, and they returned to the United States. He remained. For he had heard of a new and special assignment for which volunteers had been requested which would require another month of the most dangerous type of flying.

“…It may be felt, perhaps, that Joe should not have pushed his luck so far and should have accepted his leave and come home. But two facts must be borne in mind. First, at the time of his death, he had completed probably more combat missions in heavy bombers than any other pilot of his rank in the Navy and therefore was pre-eminently qualified, and secondly, as he told a friend early in August, he considered the odds at least fifty-fifty, and Joe never asked for any better odds than that.

£300

Bristol Sprockets (pg1 Pwr)

Here we have two original sprockets which carry the Bristol part number i.e. FB.

 

The two Bristol sprockets are probably from the engine power plant cowl gill ring system. A chain runs inside a square section ring to which the gill ring (cowl flaps for Americans). The chain operates sprockets with screw jacks attached  to open and close the cowl gill flaps. Bristol provided the complete engine and power plant hence the power plant components had “FB” prefix part numbers.

 

£75 for the pair

Bristol Engine Manifold (pg1 Pwr)

Here we have a carburettor manifold from a

Bristol Mercury or Pegasus.
It goes between the Hobson carb and supercharger

part number FB 60534 D9762

The Mercury's smaller size was aimed at fighter use, and it powered the Gloster Gauntlet and its successor, the Gloster Gladiator It was intended that the larger Pegasus would be for bombers, but as the power ratings of both engines rose the Mercury found itself being used in almost all roles. Perhaps its most famous use was in a twin-engine light bomber, the Bristol Blenheim.

£125

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£150

RAF RCAF (MERLIN ENGINE) RADIATOR SHUTTER THERMO SWITCH (pg1 Pwr)

LANCASTER BOMBER MERLIN ENGINE RADIATOR SHUTTER THERMO SWITCH. THIS SWITCH WAS REMOVED FROM LANCASTER BOMBER FM 215 AS TIME EXPIRED OCT 26/1959.

Superb item with great provenance, connection to both Merlin and Lancaster. A very rare event is to have a picture of the actual aircraft a part has been removed from, the part was almost certainly in situ when this picture was taken of

Lancaster  FM 215.

History of Lancaster FM 215

TOS 21.8.45 in RCAF; was the 4th. Converted by Avro Canada to Mk.10P; issued to #408(P) Squadron with code 'MN215'; did extensive test on SHORAN; was used for short time at Winnipeg as a SAR aircraft with #111 Composite Unit about Aug. 1959; SOC 28.9.62

Oil Heater A/M 5A/2048

220 Volt oil heater. It has a nice A/M crown. I can only assume this is for preheating oil in big aero engines. Looks serviceable.

£25

 

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R-1830 "Twin Wasp" Complete Exhaust System (pg1 Pwr)

Here we have a complete Exhaust System for the Pratt and Whitley R-1830 "Double Wasp" Radial Engine

All these pieces have part numbers stamped on to them

These are Free from Major Rust Problems and are Completely original

The Pratt & Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp was an American aircraft engine widely used in the 1930s and 1940s. Produced by Pratt & Whitney, it was a two-row, 14-cylinder, air-cooled radial design. It displaced 1,830 cu in (30.0 L) and its bore and stroke were both 5.5 in (140 mm). A total of 173,618 R-1830 engines was built, and from their use in two of the most-produced aircraft ever built, the B-24 bomber and DC-3 transport, more Twin Wasps may have been built than any other aviation piston engine in history.

R-1830 Twin Wasp at Duxford

This engine was used in a wide variety of ww2 aircraft such as

Consolidated B-24 Liberator

Douglas C-47 Dakota

Short Sunderland V

Vickers Wellington IV

 

This was also used in a lot of other RAF and USAAF Aircraft Throughout the War

 

Seen in Situ Below on the Engine

£1200

This Item is Heavy Please Contact Us for International Postage

Early Merlin Exhaust Stub (pg1 Pwr)

 

This is a Fishtail exhaust stub fitted to early Merlin variants, although its missing the flange that bolts to the engine it is in very good condition as can be seen from the pictures. A superb collectable or pattern.

 

L987730A. NIN9 50.

 0001-096. L986227

£175

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Early Merlin Exhaust Stub 3 (pg1 Pwr)

 

This is a Fishtail exhaust stub fitted to early Merlin variants, some surface rust but otherwise in good condition as can be seen from the pictures.

£175

 

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Early Merlin Exhaust Stub 4 (pg1 Pwr)

 

This is a Fishtail exhaust stub fitted to early Merlin variants, some surface rust but otherwise in good condition as can be seen from the pictures.

£175

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Early Merlin Exhaust Stub 5 (pg1 Pwr)

 

This is a Fishtail exhaust stub fitted to early Merlin variants, some surface rust but otherwise in good condition as can be seen from the pictures.

£175

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Early Merlin Exhaust Stub 6 (pg1 Pwr)

 

This is a Fishtail exhaust stub fitted to early Merlin variants, some surface rust but otherwise in good condition as can be seen from the pictures.

£295

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Early Merlin Exhaust Stub 9 (pg1 Pwr)

 

This is an Fishtail exhaust stub fitted to early Merlin variants, in crashed condition , useful for pattern or display.

£75

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Early Merlin Exhaust Stub 10 (pg1 Pwr)

 

This is an Fishtail exhaust stub fitted to early Merlin variants, in crashed condition , useful for pattern or display.

£75

Merlin XX Valve (pg1 pwr)

Here we have a Rolls Royce Merlin . In very nice straight clean condition. We have a number of these available both inlet and exhaust as well as springs.

£35

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Rolls Royce Griffon Valve (pg1 pwr)

Here we have a Rolls Royce Griffon valve.

The Griffon engine followed the Merlin into the Spitfire starting with the MK XIV and other front line WWII and post war aircraft. At 36 Litres it was considerably more powerful than the Merlin whilst being physically slightly bigger.

 

Shown above the Mk XIV Spitfire fitted with a Griffon engine , note the bubble canopy 5 blade prop larger tail and slightly extended nose to accommodate the extra power and size of the Griffon.

Out of stock more wanted contact me

Merlin XX Spark Plug (pg1 pwr)

Here we have a Rolls Royce Merlin Mk XX Spark Plug .

They are in a good clean condition.

£35

Currently out of Stock

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This belongs in the instruments section as it is closely related to RPM indicator's listed in these pages.

RPM Counter drive(pg10 ins)

This is in superb boxed serviceable condition (subject to required check's and permits only opened for the picture and immediately resealed. These drives were connected to the Merlin by the normal direct drive cable that  powered the mechanical Rev counters .It generates an electric current and power's the electrical type RPM indicator. This  type of indicator was used where it was impractical to use direct drive cable's. They were used in all Mk's of Lancaster's and many other Bombers where the cockpit or engineers panel was far remote from the engine. It was actually used to power the RPM gauge in the rear cockpit of the very rare two seat Spitfire's. These do appear from time to time but never in this condition, this should end up on a flying aircraft.

Click here to see this in the instrument's section

Rolls-Royce Merlin Carburettor (pg1 Pwr)

This is a genuine SU Carburettor for a Merlin Engine it is very good complete condition and should be serviceable after an overhaul.

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£1800

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£100

Merlin Piston Liner(pg1 pwr)

Here we have the Piston Liner for a Merlin Engine

The Piston is Moved up and Down Inside the Liner by the Con Rod

This is Suitable for Static Rebuild

MK XX Merlin inlet manifold 1 (pg1 Pwr)

Here we have a superb one piece inlet manifold for the Merlin XX. Looks to be in superb condition and should be Ok on a running engine subject to relevant checks.

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£750

 

 

MK XX Merlin inlet manifold 2 (pg1 Pwr)

Here we have a superb one piece inlet manifold for the Merlin XX. Looks to be in superb condition and should be Ok on a running engine subject to relevant checks.

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£750

Merlin Generator (pg1 Pwr)

Once again this Merlin generator looks in excellent condition turns freely is sealed and would appear to be serviceable subject to relevant checks

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£1200

Three Cylinder Lawrence of New York Radial engine model (pg1 pwr)

This is a stunning vintage one off highly detailed hand made model in metal and wood of a three cylinder engine as used in the earliest aircraft . The model looks to be aged and is not a modern reproduction. The closest match I can find is an L3 designed and built by the Lawrence Aero Engine Corporation of New York.

 

Lawrance L-3 In 1914, engineer Charles L. Lawrance became interested in the development of air-cooled aircraft engines. After considerable research, the Lawrence Aero Engine Corporation of New York, New York, began to manufacture two-cylinder models on a small scale. These included the Models A-3 and N-2. The first of the three-cylinder designs was the Model B built originally in 1916. It was a three-cylinder radial engine with power ratings progressively improved from 35 to 60 hp. This led to a follow-on series of three-cylinder radials, the L-2, L-3, L-4, and L-5. Continuing the development of his air-cooled engine designs, Lawrance later developed his Model R and then the famous Model J series of engines. As a result of Wright Aeronautical acquisition by merger of the Lawrence Company in 1923, the J series were eventually designated Wright Whirlwinds.
The U.S. Army and Navy purchased a number of Lawrence L-2 engines, which developed 60 shp. The L-3 was an improved version of the L-2

Seen under an original

Lawrance L-3 Radial Engine

Charles A. Lindbergh was planning his solo flight, New York to Paris. Lindbergh's story is aviation history. He got his airplane from Ryan in San Diego, fitted with a J-5C designed by Lawrance. He was first and alone. Lindbergh's flight was an international triumph for Wright Aeronautical. The Whirlwind engine never missed a beat.

£275

Original Spitfire/Hurricane engine plate (pg1 pwr)

This is an original cockpit engine data plate typically fitted to large numbers of 2nd WW British aeroplanes, especially in the early war days.  They were usually riveted to the cockpit side, alongside the pilot.  Often found in Battle of Britain Hurricane and Spitfire wrecks, these are highly collectable as well as forming an essential addition to a restoration or display.

£225

The first Griffons had single-stage superchargers, and were fitted to the Spitfire MK XII.

These aircraft arrived just in time to take on the Focke-Wulf 190 "Tip and Run" fighter bombers that were attacking England's South Coast. Their impressive low-level performance was used to good effect.

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For high altitude a two-stage supercharger was needed and these arrived in the Spitfire XIV

and XVIII. This enabled the Spitfire to stay in the forefront of fighter performance until the end of the war

Rolls Royce Griffon Engine rocker cover (pg1 pwr)

This is a  rocker cover from a Rolls Royce Griffon. The Griffon was a 36 Litre monster replacement for the Merlin,

. The cover is straight and still has a coating of oil on the inside with its original paint..

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Other aircraft which used the Griffon engine were the Firefly naval two-seat fighter, and the Avro Shackleton Maritime patrol aircraft .

£900

Over seas buyers please contact me for shipping quote

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English translation of the plate.

AIRPLANE DECOMPOSITION WEIGHT
Airplane without water
Airplane oil and water
Airplane navigation instruments
Airplane ammunition and weapons
Airplane safety equipment
Airplane radio and electric wires
Airplane radio equipment
Airplane Bombing equipment
Various
General equipment

£125

French Potez 54 aircraft data plate  (pg1 pwr)

This is probably unique extremely rare plate taken from a French Potez aircraft shot down during the Spanish civil war
 

This two-engine aircraft was built by the French Potez company to fulfil a 1932 specification for a new reconnaissance bomber. Built as a private venture, this aircraft, designated the Potez 54, flew for the first time on 14 November 1933. Designed by Louis Coroller, it was intended as a four-seat aircraft capable of performing duties such as bomber, transport and long-range reconnaissance.

Their first combat was in the Spanish Civil War, where they were employed by the Spanish loyalist side. A poor design that was already obsolete just two years after its introduction, when confronted by the higher performance German and Italian planes of the same period, the Potez 540 proved itself a failure in Spanish skies during the Civil War and was labelled as 'Flying Coffin by Spanish Republican pilots In the late 1930s, these aircraft were becoming obsolete so they were withdrawn from reconnaissance and bombing duties and were relegated to French transport units. They were also employed as paratrooper training and transport aircraft. By September 1939 and the beginning of World War II, they had been largely transferred to the French colonies in North Africa, where they continued to function in transport and paratrooper service. Their role in even these secondary assignments was problematic given their poor defensive armament and vulnerability to modern enemy fighters. Following the French capitulation to Germany in June 1940, those Potez 540s still flying served the Vichy French air force mainly in the French overseas colonies. Most of these machines were retired or destroyed by late 1943.

Spitfire/Hurricane engine plate (pg1 pwr)

This brass plate is an unused BLANK cockpit engine data plate typically fitted to large numbers of 2nd WW British aircraft, especially in the early war days.  They were usually riveted to the cockpit side, alongside the pilot.  Often found in Battle of Britain Hurricane and Spitfire wrecks, these are highly collectable as well as forming an essential addition to a restoration or display.  The figures were usually engraved to suit the particular engine and application, but the boxes are BLANK in this case. These are NOT cheap screen printed reproductions but are etched and black printed in brass relief.

 

£75

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Merlin 724 Engine plate (pg1 pwr)

 This is an original engine identification plate for the Merlin Mk 724 it has never been fitted and is new old stock. The Merlin 724 was a post war engine used in the North Star transport aircraft from 1946 to 1950 and was used as a civilian and military transport aircraft for the RCAF.

£175

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Merlin XX Engine plate (pg1 pwr)

 This is an original engine identification plate for the Merlin Mk XX it has never been fitted and is new old stock.

The Merlin XX 1,480 hp (1,105 kW) at 3,000 rpm at 6,000 ft (1,829 m); two-speed supercharger; boost pressure of up to +14 psi; Used in Hurricane Mk.II, Beaufighter MK II Halifax Mk.II and Lancaster MK I bombers, and in the Spitfire MK III prototypes N3297 and W3237.

 First production Merlin XX, 4 July 1940.[

£295

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Merlin III Hurricane cockpit plate (pg1 pwr)

This is superb a real rarity , I could not work out why this plate was written in French so wrote to Rolls Royce to find out and trace the engine number.

Dear Graham,

This is an unusual one. Engine number 22315 was allocated as part of a batch of 75 Merlin III for Belgium (for Hurricanes) on order number 0/4930, contract No. T.9064. The contract was cancelled in May 1940 when Belgium was invaded. Engine 22315 was never built and its engine number was cancelled. It is likely that the cockpit plate may have been prepared (in French) because the engine had been allocated to the Belgian contract, but then upon cancellation the plate was withdrawn – and potentially taken as a souvenir. Part of that batch had already been despatched from Derby, but were recalled and intercepted at the docks. Of the 75 engines in the order, 61 were not built.

Head of Spitfire Engineering, Rolls-Royce Heritage Flight

 

£325

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The De Havilland Hornet represents in many ways the peak of piston engine fighter design. With its slim fuselage, clean lines and tightly cowled engines, great attention was paid from the outset on maximising performance.


The prototype (RR915) was built on a private venture basis and flew for the first time on 28th July 1944.

Designed around the successful wooden construction principals of the De Havilland Mosquito, the Hornet was powered by a pair of 2,070 hp Merlin engines driving opposite-handed propellers and Boscombe Down trials revealed the astonishing maximum speed of 485 mph at 22,000 ft. The type also possessed superb handling characteristics, particularly in respect of its high rate of roll.

 

Initially conceived for operations in the Pacific Theatre against the Japanese, the conflict had ended before the aircraft reached operational status. Two main marks saw service with the RAF Fighter Command: The F Mk 1 and the F Mk 3 with the latter having increased fuel capacity and a large dorsal fin. Armament was four 20mm cannon and wing hard points eight ground attack rockets or a pair of 1,000 lb bombs. Alternatively, two 200 gallon drop tanks could be carried.

 

It saw active service in the Far East as a Strike Fighter during the Malayan Emergency in 1951, replacing Bristol Beaufighters and Supermarine Spitfires.

 

Merlin 131De Havilland Hornet engine plate (pg1 pwr)

This is a brass identification plate plate as fitted to the Merlin Mk 131 it is original and never fitted new old stock.

The Merlin 131 was a redesigned "slimline" versions for the De Haviland Hornet. The engine was modified to decrease frontal area to a minimum and was the first Merlin series to use down-draught induction systems. The two-speed, two-stage supercharger and S.U. injection carburettor giving a maximum boost of +25 psi . On the Hornet the Merlin 130 was fitted in the starboard nacelle the Merlin 131 fitted in the port nacelle, and was converted to a left-hand tractor engine using an additional idler gear in the reduction gear casing.

£75

Griffon Exhaust stubs (pg1 pwr)

Here we have stubs for the Rolls Royce Griffon. They are all in good serviceable condition some still in their original grease wrapping. There are six doubles and one single available.

Single Griffon stub(pg1 pwr)

Out of Stock

Double Griffon stubs (pg1 pwr)

£125 each

 

Jumo Engine cylinder liner (pg1 pwr)

 

This is a cylinder liner from a Jumo engine recovered from Poland. Jumo engines powered a range of WWII German aircraft including the BF 109.

 

 

£255

Glycol tank for a Bristol Beaufort (pg1 pwr)

A glycol tank for a Bristol Beaufort in good original condition.

The Bristol Beaufort was one of a series of aircraft derived from the earlier Bristol Blenhiem.  It was designed in response to two Air Ministry specifications issued in 1935. M.15/35 called for a torpedo-bomber and G.24/35 for a general reconnaissance and bomber aircraft. The aircraft that became the Beaufort was the third Bristol aircraft submitted to these specifications. The first aircraft to be submitted to specification G.24/35 was the Bristol Type 149, which went on to be produced in Canada as the Bolingbroke and in Britain as the Blenheim Mk IV, for use as a light bomber.

£195

Click on the picture to enlarge

FW190 Exhaust Pipe (pg1 pwr)

A Engine Exhaust Pipe from a German BMW 801 Radial Engine

This has an outer sleeve to protect the fuselage from the heat. The Pipe itself is in a good condition however the outer sleeve has some dents as show in the photo

This Type of Engine was Commonly Fitted to the Fw190, Ju88 and the Me264 as well as other Luftwaffe Aircraft

£145

Click on the picture to enlarge

FW190 Exhaust Pipe Clip (pg1 pwr)

 Engine Exhaust Pipe Clip from a German BMW 801 Radial Engine

This Type of Engine was Commonly Fitted to the Fw190, Ju88 and the Me264 as well as other Luftwaffe Aircraft

We Have 2 of these Available

£35 each

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

Vokes Hydraulic Oil Filter (pg1 pwr)

This is a Hydraulic Oil Filter made by Vokes

It has a dent and 4 small holes in the bottom

As used on the Hercules Engine

This was recovered from the Arnhem Area of Holland

Advert for Vokes

£175

        

 

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

 

Starting Ignition Booster Coil (pg1 Power)

Here we have an American made Ignition Booster Coil

It is a Type VJR 24B5 manufactured by American Bosch

It was used in American made Engines with Low Tension Magnetos such as the R-2800

R-2800 Double Wasp

£175

        

 

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

Out of stock more wanted contact me

 

RR Merlin Induction Manifold(pg1 Power)

Here we have a an Induction Manifold  for a Merlin XX onwards. It carries the fuel mix from the supercharger to the heads and sits in the middle of the V of the cylinder banks.

This is in an ok condition with some pitting and would be good for a Static Rebuild

Rolls Royce Merlin

 

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