Welcome to SpitfireSpares.com instruments section page 3


 

To find Parts and services available click on the buttons

Aircraft For Hire

AirFrame

Armaments

Canopy

Controls

Electrical

Fuel

Gun Sights

Hydraulics

Instruments

Lighting

Miscellaneous

Oxygen

Pilot Equiptment

Propellers

RFC Propellers

Power Plant

Radio

Rockets

Relics

SAS and Militaria

Undercarridge

 

HomeContact UsDelivery PolicyPayment OptionsTerms & ConditionsView Cart

 


Rockets and Flying Bombs

This area of WWII aviation collecting is about as rare as it gets.

 Their are very few survivors of the V1 and V2

This page will include a selection of  models, and replicas as well as I hope some artefacts from the real weapons.   

Vergeltungswaffen-1 (Vengeance Weapon 1), also popularly called Flying Bomb, Buzz Bomb or Doodlebug, was a German jet-propelled missile of World War II, the forerunner of modern cruise missiles. More than 8,000 V-1s were launched against London from June 13, 1944, to March 29, 1945, with about 2,400 hitting the target area. A smaller number were fired against Belgium. The rockets were launched from the Pas-de-Calais area on the northern coast of France and subsequently from other sites in German-occupied western Europe. The V-1 was about 8 metres (25 feet) long, exclusive of the long tailpipe of its jet engine and had a wingspan of about 5.5 metres (20 feet). It was launched from catapult ramps or sometimes from aircraft. It carried an 850-kilogram (1,870-pound) explosive warhead at about 580 km (360 miles) per hour and had an average range of 240 km (150 miles).

A V1 Flying Bomb

The response was to extend the attacks on the launching sites, whilst fighters formed the first defence over the Channel and the South Coast. 192 heavy AA guns and equal number of light weapons provided the next line of defence. On the eastern outskirts of London 480 balloons provided the final element. Initial patrols were made by 11 squadrons, two Mosquito-equipped for night operations.

These arrangements were inadequate and the guns were increased to 376 heavy and 540 light weapons and the balloons were strengthened to around 1000. Fighter units included the new 150 Wing at Newchurch with three squadrons of Tempests, Spitfires of 41, 91 and 322 Squadrons and Mustangs of 129, 306 and 315 Squadrons. A special flight of Tempest was formed at Wittering with pilots of the Fighter Interception Unit. This moved to Newchurch to join the other Tempest squadrons. Over the weeks which followed further units became involved including Polish Mustang, radar-equipped Mosquito and Typhoon squadrons

By 15 July 2578 V1s had reached England. 1241 were destroyed by the defences, 1280 falling in the London area. Between 9-15 July the percentage destroyed reached 50%, mainly by the fighters. The damage caused were still to high so the guns were moved to the coastal area. On 19 July 412 heavy and 600 light weapons were in place together with 168 Bofors and some rocket batteries. Now the fighters patrolled over the Channel and over central Kent, between the guns and the balloons. The guns were now receiving stocks of proximity-fused shells, which increased their results. Between 16 August and 5 September only 17% of the 1124 launched V1s reached their target area. An estimated 6,184 people were killed by these flying bombs.

The V1 was Powered by the Argus AS 104 Pulse Jet Engine

The V2 Rocket

The V-2 Rocket, was developed by Werner von Braun, Walter Dornberger and Hermann Oberth at the rocket research station at Peenemunde.     

 

The V-2 was first used in September, 1944. Like the V1 it carried a one ton warhead. However, this 14 metres (47 feet) long, liquid-fuelled rocket was capable of supersonic speed and could fly at an altitude of over 50 miles. As a result it could not be effectively stopped once launched.

Over 5,000 V-2s were fired on Britain. However, only 1,100 reached Britain. These rockets killed 2,724 people and badly injured 6,000. After the D Day landings, Allied troops were on mainland Europe and they were able to capture the launch sites and by March, 1945, the attacks came to an end.

 

 

 

All the following remains of V1 and V2 rockets are original and by their nature as flying bombs are extremely rare. Every piece of remaining rockets and flying bombs were pounced on by the Allies and shipped back to their respective countries along with the scientists who designed and built them many of whose war crimes were ignored . The only pieces now in the public domain are fragments from the bombs that crashed and exploded, most pieces were vaporised on impact and surviving parts are very unusual.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

V2 A5 Rocket rudder  (pg1 Rocket)

Graphite rudder from the A5 V2  rocket. As engines were not able to gimble at this time this was mounted in the combustion chamber to deflect the plume and hence subject to intense heat. In excellent condition.
 

Under a V2 rocket

 

Out of Stock More Wanted Contact Us

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

V1 tail unit (pg1 Rocket)

This is a fantastic piece, a complete tail from a V1 flying bomb 100% original it is obviously damaged but still a very rare large substantial and recognisable piece of the V1.

Amazingly this tail unit was sometimes packed with German propaganda leaflets here is a link to a site covering the propaganda carried in the V1 tail.
 

Under a V1 rocket

Out of stock more V1 parts always wanted contact me

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

V1 Giro auto pilot mounting tray (Pg1 rocket)

This is the heart of the V1 it holds the giro auto pilot that keeps the V1 flying RAF fighters tried to de stabilise this giro by flipping the wing tips of the V1 sending them crashing into the ground before reaching their target. In good original condition kit has some damage but is not heavily corroded and should be repairable if required.

An example seen under with the giro

Click on the picture to enlarge

399

V1  Engine part 1 (pg1 Rocket)

125

V1  Engine part 2 (pg1 Rocket)

This is another piece of the side of the engine and is 280mm long

V1  Engine part 1 (pg1 Rocket)

Here is a large, (230mm ) piece of a V1 rocket motor, this piece forms the side of the motor as seen in the diagram left.

Front view of the V1 rocket motor

V1  Engine part 2 (pg1 Rocket)

125

 Click on the pictures to enlarge them

This a big piece its part of the lower structure of the V2 a ring which forms the shell and framework of the V2 its very heavy and is 850mm long.

Out of Stock More Wanted

Contact Us

 

V2 ring structure (pg 1Rockets)

This is a sender unit from the fuel system of a V2 rocket.

V2  sender unit  2 (pg1 Rocket)

V2  sender unit  1 (pg1 Rocket)

 

V2  sender unit  1 (pg1 Rocket)

125

V2  sender unit  2 (pg1 Rocket)

This is a sender unit from the fuel system of a V2 rocket.

125

N/A

V1  Fuel pressure pick up point (pg1 Rocket)

This piece sits in the front of the V1 motor and acts as a starter in the fuel system. Seen in situ under.

 

 

Fritz flying bomb elevator (pg1 Rocket)

This is an elevator from the German Fritz flying bomb, its a big heavy piece made from solid alloy. This is s seriously rare item less of these weapons were produced than the V1 and there are only a very few surviving examples.

As early as 1940, the German Luftwaffe began serious development of un powered anti-ship missiles dropped by bombers. The missile would glide to its target, remotely guided by a controller within the aircraft. Testing in Germany proved difficult as atmospheric conditions interfered with the signals sent to the bomb, and by early 1943 the experiments had been moved to northern Italy. When Italy defected to the Allied side in September 1943, the test squadron (III/KG100) was in place to use its Fritz-X glider bombs attack the Italian fleet as it fled to Malta.

On the afternoon of 9 September, eleven Do.217 glider-bomb carriers of III/KG100 took off from an airfield near Marseilles and located the Italian fleet west of Corsica. The new battleship Roma sank after a single hit, while Italia suffered damage. Two days later, the squadron and its sister unit II/KG100 began attacks against the Allied fleet conducting amphibious landings in the Bay of Salerno.

A Fritz X badly damaged the American cruiser Savannah and slightly damaged her sister Philadelphia. On the 13th, a Fritz X seriously damaged the British cruiser Uganda and others damaged Philadelphia and two British destroyers while a Hs.293 glider bomb sank the hospital ship Newfoundland. A transport sank after a hit from an Hs.293 bomb on the 14th, and on 16 September the Battleship Warspite suffered two serious hits from Fritz X bombs and had to be towed to Malta.

Once Allied fighters arrived on the scene, the glider bombs no longer proved effective. The carrier aircraft had to fly a long, straight path to launch them, and this made them easy prey for fighters. The Fritz X, designed to penetrate warship armour, could only be used during daylight; the smaller Hs.293 had some effectiveness at night and was used in that role after the Fritz X carriers were withdrawn.

499

Here picture with the cap removed

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

V1 Mechanical Impact Fuse (Pg1 Rocket)

Here is a very rare Mechanical Impact Fuse from a V1 purchased during our trip to Arnhem

It was used as a safety fuse for if the actual detonator failed.

See the Diagrams Below

  

 

299

V2 Various components (pg1 Rocket)

Assorted V2 rocket parts

95

Shell case fragments from VI strike at Wickford Essex 2 (pg1 Rocket)

310mm across

N/A

Shell case fragments from VI strike at Wickford Essex 4 (pg1 Rocket)

This is solid steel and heavy

35

Shell case fragments from VI strike at Wickford Essex 5 (pg1 Rocket)

25

Shell case fragments from VI strike at Wickford Essex (pg1 Rocket)

 

These are fragments of a V1 that came down in Wickford in Essex, on this link , link 2 is a childhood memory of the VI hitting the Town.

 

Shell case fragments from VI strike at Wickford Essex 1 (pg1 Rocket)

160mm across

25

To swat a Bug A Hawker Tempest

 

A rare site an unexploded doodle bug VI flying bomb

 

300mm across

25

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

V1 Compressed Air tank (pg1 Rocket)

Here is a superbly rare and substantial original piece from a V1. The V1 contained two compressed air bottles of which this is one. They powered the gyroscope's that kept the V1 flying.

The tank was originally covered in layers of spring steel but this had corroded and was a real hazard so we removed the remains of the wire then removed any corrosion and painted the tank with etch primer to preserve it.

The steel is still thick and healthy and is not at all delicate.

 Finding the correct original colour of the tank is not an easy process as nearly all original pictures are in black and white. The colour pictures I have seen showed the tanks as red, orange  grey and silver. We went with a silver finish but this can easily be re painted .

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

You can see the tanks in situ just behind the wing trailing edge.

995

Overseas buyers please contact us for a shipping quote

 

V2 Gyroscope part (pg1 Rocket)

 

Here is part of the V2 Gyroscope you can see it in situ in the picture left. Click on the picture to enlarge it.

55

 

  V1 Rocket Relics from our Trip to  Arnhem

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

V1 Height Controller (pg1 Rocket)

This is a height Controller From the Control Panel of the V1

It was used in the Elevator Actuator System

Seen in Situ Under

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

V1 Wiring (pg1 Rocket)

Electrical Wiring from a V1

25

V1 Pressure Distributor 2(pg1 Rocket)

This is In Relic Condition

 

85

 

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

V1 Height Setting (pg1 Rocket)

This is part of the Autopilot. It was used for setting the Altitude that the rocket would travel at.

Seen in Situ on the left

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

V1 Tray Piece (pg1 Rocket)

This is a piece from the autopilot tray from a V1

55

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

V1 Engine Pipe (pg1 Rocket)

This Pipe Would have been connected to the Argus Pulse Jet Engine that powered the V1

55

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

V1 Fuel Filter  (pg1 Rocket)

Here is a fuel filter as used in the V1 see below in situ this piece is in relic condition see picture.

75

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

V1 Wooden Nose Cone Cover Fragment  (pg1 Rocket)

This is a fragment of the wooden nose cone used to cover the compass of the V1.

 It still has yellow paint on it and is extremely rare as the wooden parts almost never survive impact.

The complete original nose cone is shown left.

 

 

115

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

V1 Aileron Spring  (pg1 Rocket)

 

This is a spring used in the control of the aileron of the V1 seen to the left in situ

 

Click on the picture to enlarge.

V1 Rocket motor intake (pg1 Rocket)

This is a substantial piece from the V1 it is an almost complete intake with the shutters, clearly in relic condition but a nice restoration project or display item for the rocket collector.

299

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

 

V1 Giro auto pilot mounting tray 2 (Pg1 rocket)

This is the heart of the V1 it holds the giro auto pilot that keeps the V1 flying RAF fighters tried to de stabilise this giro by flipping the wing tips of the V1 sending them crashing into the ground before reaching their target. Clearly this has considerable damage but could possibly be straightened with some work.

An example seen under with the giro

199

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

V1  Engine part 3 (pg1 Rocket)

Here is a large, ( piece of a V1 rocket motor, this piece forms the side of the motor as seen in the diagram.

V1  Engine part 3 (pg1 Rocket)

125

Click on the picture to enlarge.

This is the remains of the V1 rocket motor that holds the intake grills

 

V1  Engine part 4 (pg1 Rocket)

125

Click on the picture to enlarge.

V1  Engine fuel system part (pg1 Rocket)

This piece is from the V1 fuel system it has something to do with the fuel and air mixing.

85

 

Click on the picture's to enlarge.

175

V1  pressed steel wing rib (pg1 Rocket)

This piece is from the V1 wing and is the up right part of the  pressed steel rib.

Seen in situ under.

   
 


                         


 © Copyright 2003.  SpitfireSpares.com.  All Rights Reserved.