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This section contains 100% genuine relics of the great aerial conflict Second World War including the Battle of Britain. We have added this section due to numerous enquires for this sort of personal history. All items will have been legally recovered and supported with authentification. Many parts listed in other sections of the site can be linked to the correct aircraft types. The following pieces listed on these pages are from aircraft crash sites and details of the, Squadron, Pilot ,exact date, combat details, aircraft type, and serial number. In most cases if not already supplied it will be possible for a small fee to receive copies of the Squadron Operational record book and official combat reports which are available from the record office at Kew. We have found that its allot more economical to employ the services of a professional researcher. Its costs around £50 to locate and take copies of original documents. Obviously these are crash relics and will not be in a usable condition, its the history that counts and it is possible for example to build up a collection of a Battle of Britain items from start of the battle until the end . Spitfire Spares does not support the recovery of wreckage from anything classified as a War grave or any recovery not fully compliant with the current legislation. Respect for the Brave aircrew is paramount and we will not offer or purchase any personal items recovered from aircrew killed in action serving their Country.  

Click on the picture for Rocket relics

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Click on the pictures to enlarge them

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

P38 Piston (pg 1 Relics)

Here is a piston from a P38 recovered in Poland. Unfortunately no details of the actual aircraft came with this piece.

Shown under P 38 J Lightening

 First flight of the prototype took place on January 27, 1939 and the first service models were delivered in June, 1941.

Nicknamed “Der Gabelschwanz Tuefel,” or “the fork-tailed devil,” by the German Luftwaffe, the P-38 shared credit for the destruction of the first German aircraft by an U.S. Army Air Force fighter on August 14, 1942.  The P-38 primarily served in Europe and North Africa. Its long range and twin engines made it well suited to duty in the Pacific, although smaller numbers were deployed to the Pacific theatre due to production limits.

The P-38 played a vital role in Allied war efforts, helping to achieve air superiority over Africa in 1942 and 1943. One of the more famous P-38 missions took place on April 18, 1943. In a well planned mission, 16 P-38s took off from Guadalcanal and intercepted Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto’s plane, shooting it down near Shortland Island in the Pacific.  By war’s end, the P-38 was responsible for downing more Japanese aircraft than any other Allied plane.

As the war went on the P-38 turned out to be much more than just a combat aircraft.  Many P-38s were fitted with cameras and used as reconnaissance aircraft, providing valuable intelligence data throughout the war.

By 1944 P-38s were being phased out, but continued to play a major role in the war effort in both combat and reconnaissance roles until VE Day. Some of the aircraft that stayed in service after the war were transferred to the new United States Air Force and re designated as F-38s in June, 1948.  By 1950 all of the P-38/F-38s were retired from service.

£175

Click on picture to enlarge

 Hurricane Z2505 was flown by Squadron Leader Foit Emil when it caught fire on a training flight over Loch Oich lake on 31st of August 1941. RAF Czech Fighter 310 Squadron.

310 Squadron Hurricane being rearmed RIGHT.

£125

Pilot's oxygen bottle cradle (pg1 Rel)

310 Squadron Pilots

Pilot's oxygen bottle cradle from Hawker Hurricane Z2505 - an important piece of his kit that would have mounted behind the pilot's seat. In relic condition (three bolts are holding it together for the photo where the original rivets have failed) this item could be improved with some TLC and make a fascinating exhibit, especially if you have a bottle to put in it!  Hawker Aircraft stamps are present on the cradle. 

Click to enlarge the picture.

Canadian Hurricane link chute (p1 Rel)

HERE WE HAVE  A GENUINE MACHINE G__ LINK CHUTE AS FOUND ON HAWKER HURRICANE BW874 CRASH SITE ON OCT 96. IT WAS CLEANED, IDENTIFIED. IT HAS SMALL DENTS , IT DIDN'T BURNT AND IS NOT CORRODED MADE OF ALUMINIUM

INCLUDING THE SEA HURRICANE XIIA,CANADIAN CAR & FOUNDRY BUILT 1,451 HURRICANES, ALSO TURNED OUT 1,206 WINGS (MOST W 12 X .303 BROWNING MG MOUNTS) AND 1,168 OLEO LEGS

£65

Click on the pictures to enlarge

Spade Handle Victory bell (pg1 rel)

Here we have a  Spade Handle Round Top Victory bell. It's Handle Marked with a V without the  Morse code. These were cast from the remnants of enemy aircraft shot down during WWII over Great Britain. This information is written around the base of the bell. It was produced for the RAF benevolent fund. Cast in metal from German Aircraft Shot down over Britain 1939-1945 and has pictures of the big three Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin. The bell is in good condition for its age and there is no pitting on the inside or out

Out of stock more wanted contact me

Click on the pictures to enlarge

Mushroom Handle Victory bell (pg1 rel)

Here we have a  Mushroom Handle Round Top Victory bell. It's Handle Marked with a V and ...- which is Morse code for V. These were cast from the remnants of enemy aircraft shot down during WWII over Great Britain. This information is written around the base of the bell. It was produced for the RAF benevolent fund. Cast with metal from German Aircraft Destroyed over Britain 1939-1945 and has pictures of the big three Churchill, Roosevelt, and Stalin. The bell is in good condition but there is some pitting on the in the bell. This was produced by The Bucks Die-Casting Company in Burnham.

£125

Click on the pictures to enlarge

Out of stock more wanted contact me

Churchill Victory Plaque (pg1 relics)

Here we have Victory Plaque which consists of Churchill's bust on the Letter V

This Measures Approximately 280mm x 213mm and is made from cast aluminium

 

 

B17 Bomb Release mechanism 1 (pg1 rel)

Here is a Bomb release mechanism from a B17 Bomber

This part has been released from a private collection and all I can tell you is this aircraft crashed at Hanningfield in Essex during WWII.

£35

B17 Bomb Release mechanism 2 (pg1 rel)

Here is a Bomb release mechanism from a B17 Bomber

This part has been released from a private collection and all I can tell you is this aircraft crashed at Hanningfield in Essex during WWII.

£35

B17 Bomb Release mechanism 3 (pg1 rel)

Here is a Bomb release mechanism from a B17 Bomber

This part has been released from a private collection and all I can tell you is this aircraft crashed at Hanningfield in Essex during WWII.

£35

Seen Under the Wright Cyclone R-1820 Engine

B17 Magneto part (pg1 rel)

Here is a piece of the magneto from a B17 Bomber this part has been released from a private collection and all I can tell you is this aircraft crashed at Hanningfield in Essex during WWII. The B17 was powered by four Wright Cyclone R-1820 Engines

The Boeing B-17, was a United States standard heavy bomber. B-17s were flown by the United States Army Air Corps (USAAC), throughout the American participation in the Second World War. They were used by the US Eighth Air Force, based in the UK, to bombard German targets in Europe during daylight hours, a method which resulted initially in very heavy losses of aircraft and crew. As B-17 refinements progressed, along with better pilot training and tactics, it would become a formidable adversary in the Allied war against Germany.

£35

B17 Trailing Aerial (pg1 rel)

Here is a trailing aerial from a B17, this part has been released from a private collection and all I can tell you is this aircraft crashed at Hanningfield in Essex during WWII.

£35

 

Click on the picture above to enlarge it

A B17 from the 568th Bomber squadron over England.

B17 568th Bomber Squadron airframe Relic (pg1 rel)

Here is a substantial piece of airframe from a B17 purchased from a private collection,  I can tell you is this aircraft crashed at Hanningfield in Essex during WWII.

It has a control cable attached and may be part of one of the control surfaces. it is 27"/  680mm long.

I found the following information on the internet. B17 Serial number 230610 called Red Ass model B17 F 568th Bomber Squadron.

Accepted by USAAF 26 Jun 43. Cheyenne Mod Center 29 Jun 43. Gore Field 30 Jun 43. Grand Isle 15 Jul 43. Dalhart 20 Jul 43. Grand Isle 26 Jul 43. Presque Isle 3 Aug 43. 8th AF 5 Aug 43.

Plane caught fire during assembly for a mission to Duren which was later abandoned.

Crew bailed out, plane crashed as West Hanningfield near Chelmsford, Essex on 17 Oct 43.

 

Out of stock

Waclaw Lapkowski

The following engine parts all come from the Merlin of Hurricane P2985

Hurricane P2985 Merlin part 1 (pg1 relics)

Part 1 £55

Hurricane P2985 Merlin part 3 (pg1 relics)

Part 3 £55

Hurricane P2985 Merlin part 5 (pg1 relics)

 Part 5   £55

Hurricane P2985 Merlin part 7(pg1 relics)

Big end bearing shell.

Out of stock

Hurricane P2985

The following parts were recovered from the crash site of Hurricane P2985. I can guarantee the provenance of these piece's and will supply the new owner with three pages of A4 listing information of the 303 Squadron Pilot Waclow Lapkowski who was flying this aircraft when he was shot down on the 5th of September 1940. In addition a copy of the combat report is included. I will also supply the history of these piece's since its recovery so it is fully traceable to the dig site.

303 RAF Polish Squadron was the top scoring Squadron of the Battle of Britain and as such these are hugely desirable piece's of History for the Battle of Britain collector.

Waclaw Lapkowski second from right at the time this picture was taken he was Squadron Leader of the famous 303 Squadron.

 

Born on 6th November 1913, Waclaw Lapkowski was in the Polish Air Force before the war and was serving with its 112 Squadron at the outbreak of war. On 6th September 1939 he shared a He111 and a Do17 with a He111 destroyed on the 9th.

He subsequently made his way to England, details unknown, and joined 303 squadron on the day it was formed at Northolt – 2nd August 1940. He claimed a Ju88 destroyed on 5th September. On that day he was himself shot down by a Me109 in combat over Gillingham. He baled out, with a broken leg and burns, landed at Hawkwell and was admitted to Rochford (Southend) Hospital. His Hurricane, P2985, crashed at Bonvill's Farm, North Benfleet.

Awarded the VM (5th Class, gazetted 23rd December 1940) Lapkowski did not return to the squadron until 6th January 1941. He returned from a sweep over France on the 22nd with 25 yards of telephone wire round his engine. Lapkowski was awarded the KW (gazetted 1st April 1941) and was wounded on 13th April 1941 and admitted to hospital. Recovered, on 5th May he took command of 303 Squadron, on 4th June he damaged a Me109, on the 8th he destroyed one, on the 22nd two more, on the 24th another and on the 27th he damaged another.

On 2nd July 941 Lapkowski was leading 303, in Spitfire B8596, flying with the Polish Wing escorting Blenheims to Lille. They were attacked in mid-Channel by fifty Me109’s coming down from a higher altitude. Lapkowski was shot down. His body was washed ashore and he is buried in Lombardsidje Communal Cemetery, Belgium.

303 Squadron Pilots with one of their Battle of Britain Hurricanes.

Formed on August 2, 1940 in Northolt, No. 303 Kosciuszko Squadron was the second Polish fighter squadron to be formed on British soil. Its personnel recruited mostly from 111 and 112 Squadrons of the Pursuit Brigade, which had fought with distinction in the Polish campaign of 1939. In spite of some difficulties, mostly stemming from inadequate command of English, conversion to Hurricanes and training in the RAF tactics proceeded smoothly, and a month later the squadron entered the Battle - soon proving to be the hardest-hitting unit in the entire Fighter Command.

The following engine parts all come from the same Merlin and aircraft detailed above and the guarantees  and information supplied applies to all the parts listed under

Hurricane P2985 Merlin part 2(pg1 relics)

Part 2 £55

Hurricane P2985 Merlin part 4 (pg1 relics)

This is a piece of the crank case.

Out of stock

Hurricane P2985 Merlin part 6 (pg1 relics)

Part 6 £25

Hurricane P2985 Merlin part 8 (pg1 relics)

Part 8 £55

Hurricane P2985 Merlin part 9 (pg1 relics)

Part 9 £25

MK VIII Oxygen control valve (pg1 relic)

This is an oxygen control valve which turned on and off the Pilots oxygen supply an identical unit is fitted to the RHS of the Spitfire cockpit an undamaged example can be seen here

I bought this example-le from the person that recovered the wreckage of a Wellington Bomber R1589 of 57 Squadron on the 4th of July 1941 near Southery.

 Pilot Sgt William Hoskins of Wellington R1589 DX and his gunner Sgt Robert Simeon Sparks crashed, they are buried near to each other. Their plane crashed on Southery Road Feltwell with unexploded bombs in the wreckage.

See here for details of their burial

Wellington R1589 delivered by Vickers (Chester) between Aug 40 and May 41.  Crashed 0800 4 Jul 41 at Larman's Fen off Southery Road, Feltwell, Norfolk. The cause of the crash was attributed to instrument failure. Southery Road was closed for several days after the accident while unexploded bombs were removed from the wreckage. Sgt W.J.H.Hoskins KIA Sgt J.C.B.Irwin KIA F/S E.D.Evans KIA Sgt R.S.Sparkes KIA Sgt P.H.Reay KIA Sgt Poulton KIA "

£75

Nos 1 Squadron Pilots in 1940

Hurricane V7375 control column mount (pg1 relic)

This is a substantial piece of Battle of Britain history containing both right angled mounting brackets which support the control column , the brackets are both undamaged and could be separated and used in a static project if required.

Hurricane V7375  of nos 1 Squadron was shot down by a BF 110 on the 31st of August 1940 and crashed at Halstead.

Sgt H Merchant bailed out and survived but was burned.

Previously he force landed a Hurricane P2980 at Withyham, Kent on the 23rd August 1940 after running out of fuel. He hit some trees but was unhurt.

 

£275

JU 88 drift sight bracket shot down 27th September 1940 (pg1 relics)

This drift sight bracket was purchased from a local man who as a boy personally took it from the wreck of a JU 88 shot down on the 27th of September 1940 and landed on Porlock beach in Somerset England. Upon crashing the aircraft was guarded by the local home guard but after being called to another task the locals stripped the wreck.

JU88 from 3rd/F 123 was shot down by 152 Squadron Spitfires. Three Spitfire's from 152 Squadron Warmwell scrabbled and caught up with the German over the Bristol channel and attacked it. The JU 88 dived steeply and headed west . Pilot Officer Eric Marrs was one of those in pursuit and fired several bursts into the 88. A fact sheet with full details of the action will be supplied with the piece.

152 fighter Squadron

No 152 Squadron was formed on 1 October 1918 at Rochford as a Camel night fighter unit and in mid-October moved to France to defend Allied Bases against enemy night bombers. The war ended three weeks later and 30 June 1919, the squadron disbanded.

On 1 October 1939, No 152 reformed at Arklington with Gladiators and became operational on 6 November. In January 1940, conversion to Spitfires began and after a period of defensive patrols in the north-east, the squadron moved to Warmwell to help defend southern England against attacks from the Luftwaffe forces now based in northern France. Throughout the Battle of Britain, No 152 defended this sector which included Portland naval base

£285

The Lancaster headed out over the Norfolk coast to rendezvous with aircraft drawn from other airfields in the N. East. The armada then crossed the German coast just south of the border with Denmark, before heading south-east to the target area. Several aircraft fell prey to the German air defences on the way out, and were seen to plunge down to earth in flames. JB659 survived and completed her mission. The pilot turned onto a heading to take the Lancaster on the first leg of the journey back to Bourn, a journey which, tragically, was not to be completed.

As the aircraft neared the Dutch coast, a Messerschmitt night-fighter dived out of the night sky and attacked the bomber. The Lancaster stood no chance against the firepower and superior manoeuvrability of the Messerschmitt, and the encounter ended when the cockpit of the Lancaster was blasted away from the fuselage and hurtled down to earth, taking the bodies of the pilot and the born aimer with it.

The remainder of the plane, with two of the four engines still running, crashed in flames onto a farmhouse, some five miles south of Amsterdam, killing the farmer and his family.

The bodies of Allan Hart and Gordon Williams were recovered bv the Germans, and buried in the local cemetery at Zwanenburg, where the graves are now cared for by Rosalind Emerson, a Norfolk lady now living in Holland. The bodies of the Dutch family were also recovered and buried at Zwanenburg. The other five members of the crew of JB659 were however buried deep inside the fuselage at the crash site, and had remained so for some 57 years.

Plans were in hand to build a marina, and as the work involved the site of the 1944 crash, a Royal Dutch Airforce Salvage Team was called to excavate the wreckage and recover the remains of the five airmen.

After consultations with known relatives, it was decided to bury the five crewmen in a shared grave next to their comrades in the cemetery at Zwanenburg.

Part 1 supercharger casing(pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

This is a substantial piece of the supercharger casing from one of JB 659's Packard Merlin's. This is a large piece measuring  approximately 450mm by 250 mm.

£255

 

Part 4 Crank case (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture's to enlarge them

This is part of the crank case  from one of JB 659's Packard Merlin's. This  piece has  wood embedded in it presumably where it made contact with the farm house. You can clearly see where the piston liner attaches.

Measures 250 mm by 250 mm.

£175

Part 6 inlet tube (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

This part of the inlet from one of JB 659's Packard Merlin's you can clearly see where the tube bolts onto the head.

Measures 200 mm by120 mm.

N/A

Part 8 cam follower (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

This is a cam follower from one of JB 659's Packard Merlin's

N/A

art 9  drive (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

This part is one of the internal drive gears from one of JB 659's Packard Merlin's .

N/A

Part 12 crank case (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

This part is a piece from the crankcase you can see where the big end shell used to attach from one of JB 659's Packard Merlin's .

N/A

Part 15  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

  £35

 

Part 17  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

N/A

 

Part 19  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

 

Part 21  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

 

Part 23  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

Part 25  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

 

Part 27  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

 

Part 29  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

 

Part 31  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

 

Part 33  (pg1 relics)

 

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

Merlin parts from Lancaster JB659(pg1 relics)

 

JB 659 was a Mk III Avro Lancaster of 97 Squadron, and in January 1944 was stationed at RAF Bourn.

At precisely ten past five, on the afternoon of January 30th 1944, JB659 took off from Bourn airfield as part of a mass bombing raid on Berlin. The Lancaster was fuelled up for a possible 2000 mile round trip, and carried a bomb load of five two-thousand pound bombs, as well as marker flares. There were seven crew on board:

Pilot Officer Allan Robert Hart, 22, RAAF
WO.II Gordon Ivan Williams, 21, RCAF
Sgt. Leslie Clifton, 24, RAF(VR)
Sgt. Douglas F. Hicks, 24, RAF(VR)
Sgt. Williarn Joseph .Tones, 21, RAF(VR)
F/Sgt. Charles M. Price, 30, RCAF
F/Sgt. . Harold T. Boal, 20, RAAF

Mk III Lancaster

 

You can see details of the recovery on this link

Pictures and details of the crew and the operation can be found on this link.

Video of the complete story link

History of 97 Squadron Link

Mk III Lancaster

The following parts are from  JB659's Packard Merlin 28's.

After the recovery packs of pieces of wreckage from Lancaster JB659 shot down over Holland were sold off the to raise funds to allow for an appropriate display of the wreckage of JB-659. I  did not buy these parts directly from the original source but they were supplied to me from a trusted contact who purchased them directly from the original source.

 

Part 2 inlet tube (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

This is a piece of the inlet tube from one of JB 659's Packard Merlin's which sits on top of the engine and carry's fuel mix from the supercharger to the inlet manifold. The tubing on the top connects to the K Gass pumps for cold starting.

This piece measures  approximately 300 mm by 140 mm

£175

Part 3 Crank case (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

This is part of the lower crank case and you can clearly see where the piston liner attaches and the engine mount.

This piece measures  approximately 360 mm by 300 mm

£175

 

Part 5  inlet tube (pg1 relics)

This is a piece of the inlet tube from one of JB 659's Packard Merlin's which sits on top of the engine and carry's fuel mix from the supercharger to the inlet manifold.

Click on the picture to enlarge

Measures 300 mm by160 mm.

£55

Part 7 cam follower (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

This is a cam follower from one of JB 659's Packard Merlin's

N/A

Mk III Lancaster

Part 10 Head (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

This part is a piece from the head or crankcase you can see where the head bolt used to attach from one of JB 659's Packard Merlin's .

N/A

Part 11 crank case (pg1 relics)

This part is a piece from the crankcase you can see where the big end shell used to attach from one of JB 659's Packard Merlin's .

Click on the picture to enlarge

£45

Part 14  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

Part 16  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

 

Part 18  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

 

Part 20  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

 

Part 22  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

Part 24  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

 Part 26  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

Part 28 (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

Part 30  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

 

 

Part 32  (pg1 relics)

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

 

Part 34  (pg1 relics)

 

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

Battle of France Hurricane escape door (pg1 air)

This is one of  best pieces in my collection. It is from one of the first L series production Hurricanes. And one of the first Hurricanes to see combat and a victory in France  . It is a superb piece of historic aviation and probably the most substantial, original, un restored, complete part of one of the very earliest Hurricanes and in that respect is unique.

It bears the serial number of the aircraft  L 1910.

Click on the picture to enlarge

Find this in the airframe section click on this link

Click on the pictures to enlarge

 

Halifax MK I Bomb release  (pg1 relics)

Here are the remains of a bomb release from a MK I Halifax bomber.

We do not have the aircrafts history but this piece was recovered from Arnhem Holland .

Shown under a Halifax Bomber

£65

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge

Propeller Hub (pg1 relics)

 

This hub was again recovered in the Arnhem area of Holland. We are unable at this time to identify which aircraft it came from but it is a big piece.

 It was badly damaged when it came down .

 If asked to guess I would say it was probably German in origin. If you can ID this piece please contact us 

£175

International buyers please contact me for a postage quote.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

£750

International buyers please contact me for a shipping quote

Dornier 17 Door  (pg 1 Relics)

Here is a complete access door from a DO 17 bomber recovered from Holland .

The door drops down out of the belly of the aircraft once closed the door acts as a floor for the gunner to lie on .

The door although damaged it is complete and still has the access steps door handle attached and armour plate to protect the gunner. A small part of the original wooden floor is attached to the armour plate.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

£495

BF110 wheel door   (pg 1 Relics)

Here we have a wheel door from a BF 110 it still has its ID plate attached see left, I stand to be corrected but I believe with German parts it is often possible to identify the specific aircraft from the plate please contact me if you have any further information on this.

The Messerschmitt Bf 110, often called the Me 110, was a twin-engine heavy fighter (Zerstörer – German for "Destroyer") in the service of the Luftwaffe during WWII. Goring was a proponent of the Bf 110, and nicknamed it his Eisenseiten ("Ironsides").Development work on an improved type to replace the Bf 110, the ME 210 began before the war started, but its teething troubles resulted in the Bf 110 soldiering on until the end of the war in various roles, alongside its replacements, the Me 210 and the ME 410.

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