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THE SAS

  This is the  SAS section on these pages will be hard to find parts to convert and supply your wartime SAS vehicles including armaments along with a range of equipment used by the famous SAS.

Also includes other Military items and deactivated weapons.

Please note all de activated weapons are now subject  to new EU regulations de activated weapons sold on this website may need new de activation certificates before a sale can be confirmed. If you wish to purchase a de activated weapon please contact me before completing the shopping cart.

The Special Air Service

             

The Special Air Service was a unit of the British army in WWII, formed in July 1941 by David Stirling and originally called "L" Detachment, Special Air Service Brigade — the "L" designation and Air Service name being a tie-in to a British disinformation campaign, trying to deceive the Axis into thinking there was a paratrooper regiment with numerous units operating in the area (the real SAS would 'prove' to the Axis that the fake one existed). It was conceived as a commando force to operate behind enemy lines in the North Africa campaign and initially consisted of five officers and 60 ranks Its first mission, in November 1941, was a parachute drop in support of the operation crusader offensive. Due to German resistance and adverse weather conditions, the mission was a disaster: 22 men, a third of the unit, were killed or captured. Its second mission was a success: transported by the long range desert group, it attacked three airfields in Libya destroying 60 aircraft without loss In September 1942 it was renamed 1st SAS, consisting at that time of four British squadrons, one Free French, one Greek, and the boat section.

In January 1943, Stirling was captured in Tunisia and Paddy Maine replaced him as commander. In April 1943, the 1st SAS was reorganized into the Special Raiding Squadron under Mayne's command and the Special boat squadron was placed under the command of George Jellico. The Special Raiding Squadron fought in Sicily and Italy along with the 2nd SAS, which had been formed in North Africa in 1943 in part by the re-naming of the small scale raiding group The Special Boat Squadron fought in the Aegean Islands  until the end of the war. In 1944 the SAS Brigade was formed from the British 1st and 2nd SAS, the French 3rd and 4th SAS and the Belgium 5th SAS It was tasked with parachute operations behind the German lines in France and carried out operations supporting the Allied advance through Belgium, the Netherlands, and eventually into Germany.

 

 

£2995

Potential buyers should contact me for a shipping quote or to discuss collection

 

MG 42 Tripod AA Mount and complete set of accessories (pg1 SAS)

All the pictures will enlarge by clicking on them. so take your time and have a good look at everything that is included

From my personal collection I have owned for many years I am releasing this is a superb set , the MG 42 itself is a post war model but is identical in all respects to the wartime model. The gun is an old specification deact, due to new EU rules I am not allowed to sell this gun without it being deacticavated to the new specification which would basically ruin it. If a UK buyer buys the equipment the gun will be lent to you on indefinite loan to keep the collection together for display. Overseas buyers will only get the accessories minus the gun which has to stay in my ownership.

                                      

Everything you see minus the gun is included in the sale and includes both the tripod mount and the anti aircraft mount. The tripod mount includes a superb spotting optic which is crystal clear and functions as it should this is housed in a box on the tripod when not in use. Everything works . Also included is the MG 42 tool kit , spare barrel holder a very rare anti aircraft sight which folds up into its own case. The sling, ammo case, magazine, canvas bag and container are all included. This is the most complete set of equipment i have ever seen and is possibly unique as a collection.

                 

All the pictures will enlarge by clicking on them. so take your time and have a good look at everything that is included

                             

The MG 42, possibly the best machine gun ever created. Whether called the “linoleum ripper” by Soviet soldiers, the “Spandau” by the British, “Hitler’s zipper” by the Americans, or Hitlersage (“Hitler’s saw”) or “Bonesaw” by its German users, the MG 42 machine gun proved its combat worth on every European battlefield. Its ominous and terrifying “ripping cloth report” announced to all the presence of the best machine gun available

                        

The MG 42 fired a 7.92mm round. With a muzzle velocity of 2,480 feet per second the MG 42’s effective range was nearly 1,100 yards. The gun used a 50-round flexible metal belt feed, or, alternatively, a 75-round snail drum magazine. A full 50-round belt of ammo would be depleted in a 21/2-second burst; the 75 round drum in 31/2 seconds. To permit longer fire bursts, MG 42 crews normally linked together several 50 round belts. Ammunition boxes (weighing 22 pounds each) held five separate belts totalling 250 rounds per box. A good crew could shoot 250 rounds in 12½ seconds of continuous fire, or 20-30 seconds by firing quick bursts.

As good as the MG 42 was, there were still complaints about its performance. First, unlike the MG 34, it could not fire single shots. Another complaint that arose due to the high rate of fire was that during prolonged firing the gun tended to veer away from the target due to the vibration and even push its operator backward. Once the gun was set on its tripod these problems vanished, and the MG 42 became the perfect sustained fire support weapon.

The tremendous rate of fire coming from the MG 42 was considered by some to be a waste of ammunition. To counter that argument, others said that since a soldier, in the Germans’ experience, only fired at an enemy he could see and time (only seconds) was fleeting, the more bullets directed at the enemy the greater chance for a kill.

                       

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MG 42 AA tripod mount (pg1 SAS)

Here is a an Anti Aircraft mount for the MG 42 in good condition its complete and operates as it should with free movement of all the parts.

Click on the pictures to enlarge

£895

International buyers should contact me for a shipping quote .

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Throat Microphone Type 2 MK II (pg1 SAS)

This is a British Army Microphone throat low level type 2 MK II for use with Wireless Set WS38. Stores reference ZA19734. 1939-1945 period.

£125

 Please note this is only available to collectors and re enactors for display only in the UK.

Fairburn Sykes knife (pg1 SAS)

Here is an exact reproduction of the famous WWII Fairburn Sykes knife in Sheffield steel complete with a copy of the scabbard in leather. This knife was used by commandoes and the SAS and was a lethal weapon in trained hands. Shown under during sentry removal training in WWII.

Will not be sold to anyone under 18.

Foreign buyers should check they are legally allowed to import and own this knife. No responsibility will be taken for custom seizers overseas you must check the laws relating to this purchase.

£75

 Please note this is only available to collectors and re enactors for display only in the UK.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

£300

Original Third Pattern Fairburn Sykes knife (pg1 SAS)

Here is a third pattern WWII Fairburn Sykes knife complete with the scabbard in leather. This knife was used by commandoes and the SAS and was a lethal weapon in trained hands.

The Third Pattern is easily recognized by its ringed alloy grip. Each mould cavity left its own embossed number on the casting. This number appears near the top of the pommel. Later post-war knives do not have this number as the moulds were destroyed after the war. The quality of the castings is generally very good. The handles had the mold parting marks removed and they were then copper plated. Most of the handles were finished black although some were nickel plated. Some people prefer the ergonomics of the Third Pattern grip. Others say that it ruined the balance of the knife. Truth is, it was the introduction of the thin blades that really ruined the balance, not the change to the grip.

Will not be sold to anyone under 18.

Foreign buyers should check they are legally allowed to import and own this knife. No responsibility will be taken for custom seizers overseas you must check the laws relating to this purchase.

Click on the pictures to enlarge

Out of stock more required contact me

Bren Gun Anti aircraft mount (pg1 Arm)

Here we have a superb Bren Gun AA mount, it can also be used as a tripod. It is all free and working as it should.

If required I will send pictures of it set up with a Bren mounted on it but its difficult to get a background free picture for the website so I have used a picture from the internet to show how it is set up.

The pictures of it folded up left is the actual mount for sale.

Click on the pictures to enlarge

Below an M63 fitted with a 50 call MG

50 Calibre Anti Aircraft Mount (pg1 Arm)

Here is an original M63 50 calibre anti aircraft mount its in excellent condition and works as it should complete with a 100 round ammo box.

Click on the pictures to enlarge

Please note this sale is for the 50 call mount only does not include the MG.

Find this on the armaments pages link here

This item is heavy and large international buyer please contact me for a shipping quote

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Shown above the Vickers K fitted to the SAS desert jeeps.

Vickers K machine Gun SAS (pg1 Arm)

This is a solid all metal and wood replica of the Vickers K machine gun, deacivated versions of this MG are extremely rare and command prices of up to 10K.

This replica has a fixed magazine and is perfect for display or use on a SAS jeep.

I have another model available with a mag which can be removed I also have spare mags please  Contact me  for your requirements. These guns do not fire or dry fire they are purely for display you must be over 18 to order no licence is required in the UK for ownership.

The Vickers K machine gun, known as the Vickers Gas Operated (Vickers G.O.) in British service, was a rapid-firing machine gun developed and manufactured for use in aircraft by Vickers-Armstrong The high rate of fire was needed for the small period of time when the gunner would be able to fire at an attacking aircraft.

The SAS adopted the Vickers K for their hit and run tactics, mounting on their jeeps.

Over the years, it was assumed by some that the latter services took the phased-out VGO because they could obtain no other suitable machine guns but with its high rate of fire and low-friction locking design (which proved resistant to jams from sand), the LRDG and SAS found the G.O. markedly superior to either the .303 in (7.7 mm) water cooled Vickers or the Bren gun.

 

Find this in the armaments page link here

 

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Bren Gun (pg1 Arm)

This is an original de activated Bren Gun Mk II dated 1943. It has a current British standard deact cert but due to new EU legislation this may require updating before purchase please contact me .

Find this in the armaments page link here

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge

2 pieces available £120 each

These are heavy international buyers contact me for shipping quote.

Sherman Tank track links recovered from the Arnhem/Nijmegen area of Holland

2 pieces available £75 each

 These are heavy international buyers contact me for shipping quote.

Sherman Tank tracks recovered from the Arnhem/Nijmegen area of Holland .(pg1 SAS)

Here are  pieces of Tank track from a Sherman Tank recovered from the Arnhem/ Nijmegen area in Holland.

 

Above Sherman Tanks in Arnhem. Below Dutch citizens cheering British Sherman tanks in Holland

WW1 GUARDS BDE Depot Caterham Presentation Framed Photo (pg1 SAS)

A nice presentation photo of WW1 period in its original oak frame & never removed. Size 15 X 13 inches. This shows a early WWI Lorry at the Guards Training Depot at Caterham with 25 Guardsmen of the Grenadier ,Coldstream, Scots ,Irish and Welsh Guardson. Also an "In Memorandum" a list of names to reverse which include the CO of the Kings Company ,Capt Malcolm. This presented to a Doctor J.FULLER on behalf of A.Thorne DSO, possibly the depots CO. Great picture and an interesting RESEARCH project.. Note that all the Guardsmen are either Corporals or Lance Corporals.

Click on the pictures shown left to enlarge them.

Although not related to the SAS I acquired this picture as it is an interesting early piece which may be of interest to my customers.

£120

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Wartime dated .303 shell cases(pg1 Arm)

Finally we have now managed to source some .303 wartime dated shell cases. These have been difficult to find as its now a disused calibre. We have dates from 1940 and if you want a specific date please ask otherwise we will send a selection as they come to hand. They will arrive in their original used condition and have not been cleaned. All cases are fired and inert. 

  £25 for ten

Find these in the armaments section link here

 

 

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British 2 inch mortar parachute flare  (pg1 SAS)

Here is an inert fired wartime parachute flare in nice original condition.

Shown above British troops with a 2" Mortar

£120

 

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British Officers 37 pattern Webbing (pg1 SAS)

This is a really nice clean set of webbing in 1937 pattern for a British  Officer.

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£275

 

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British 2Lb Shell casing dated 1940 (pg1 SAS)

Shown above a 2Lb anti tank gun.

£35

Original 50 cal links (pg3 arm)

Here we have new old stock 50 calibre links in their original box.10 links in each box. If you require more than one box postage will be combined.

see these in armaments link

.50 Calibre Ammo Box (pg1 SAS)

originally used in the WWII B-17 "Flying Fortress" .50 Caliber Ammo magazine. New Condition, in the original box Type 0-1,  these were the clip on style used on the 50calls used by the SAS.

£155

Click the picture's to enlarge 

WWI 5-15 VP Telescope for high Angle Gun 1917 (pg1 SAS)

 

The "high angle gun" is a British naval term for a anti-aircraft 80 degree elevation gun

Here is superb telescope for a high angle gun. The Optics work perfectly and it comes in its original box. It is the illuminated version with cross hairs.

Made by W Ottway and Co Ltd  Ealing . High angle guns were used in an anti aircraft role for shooting down both aircraft and Zeppelins.

£275

This is a heavy piece over seas buyers contact us for a shipping quote

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Bren Gun Webbing (pg1 SAS)

This is a bag that carries a Bren when broken down into component parts. original in great condition.

£75

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Original WW2 Holster and Ammo Pouch (pg1 SAS)

Here we have a Light Coloured Gun Holster and Ammo Pouch

The Holster is Dated 1943 and was produced by Craft Ltd

£55

German Wehrmacht Afrika Korps dust goggles (pg1 SAS)

The German Africa Corps (German: Deutsches Afrikakorps, DAK), or the Afrika Korps as it was popularly called, was the German expeditionary force in Libya and Tunisia during the North African Campaign of World War II. The reputation of the Afrika Korps is synonymous with that of its first commander Erwin Rommel, who later commanded the Panzer Army Africa which evolved into the German-Italian Panzer Army  and Army Group Africa. Goggles in good original condition in their original paper envelope.

£45

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German Pickelhelme remains from the Somme near Deville Wood (pg1 SAS)

For full details enlarge the picture left

£155

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German J.P. Saucer and Sohn Gew 98 sniper rifle magazine from the Somme near Deville Wood (pg1 SAS)

For full details enlarge the picture left

£125

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Two forks and numbered spoon Falklands war recovered from Argentinean Submarine (pg1 SAS)

For full details enlarge the picture left

£125

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Main wheel, bearing German panzer 4 recovered from Bastogne Battle of the Bulge (pg1 SAS)

For full details enlarge the picture left

£175

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Eagle removed from a grain sack found in a barn near Amiens left over from the German occupation in WWII (pg1 SAS)

For full details enlarge the picture left

£125

 

Mk.2 Brodie Helmet (pg 1 SAS)

This is the Mk II Version of the Brodie Helmet which served the British and Commonwealth forces throughout World War II. It is Stamped with the manufacturers mark BMB (Briggs Motor Body Ltd) showing that this is a British Helmet and it is Dated 1940

Several Commonwealth nations, such as Australia, New Zealand, Canada and South Africa, produced their own versions of the MK II, which can be distinguished from those made in Britain.

£195

Ypres 1914-1918

The following items were purchased personally from collectors in Ypres Belgium and all came from the First World War Battles that took place in and around Ypres. They will be supplied with certificates of authenticity.

The British and common wealth soldiers suffered a staggering one million casualties in the Ypres area during world war one. The Menen gate memorial seen left contains the names of 55,000 men who have no know graves and still lie buried in the surrounding fields.

 Each Day at 8 pm the last post is played by local buglers as a tribute to the men who gave their lives in this most brutal of wars. The whole city of Ypres including the Cathedral were completely destroyed.

Ypres was a renowned medieval town that had once thrived as a centre for textiles.

 

In WWI, Ypres became synonymous with destruction, trench warfare, poisonous gas and military stalemate.

 

The Germans swiftly advanced through Belgium in their drive to Paris but failed to take the Ypres salient. It was in this area that three Battle of Ypres took place and nearby the battle of Passchendale . What now appears to be a medieval town belies the fact that most of Ypres was rebuilt after World War One had finished.

 

In the late C17th the fortifications of the town had been modernised by Vauban. He reduced the number of fortified gates into the town from six to four. However, as a result of the major changes that had occurred in society, by 1914, these fortifications had become redundant. Road widening schemes and a new rail line meant that the old gates as designed by Vauban had been reduced to one and many of his ramparts had been pulled down.

 

On October 13th 1914, German troops from the 3rd Reiter Division, part of the German IV Reiter Korps, entered Ypres. After holding the town’s Burgomaster to ransom, they took 75,000 Belgium Francs. The next day, the British Expeditionary Force entered the city – the men from the 3rd Reiter Division swiftly withdrew in the face of much greater numbers confronting them. The town stayed in the hands of the Allies for the rest of the war.

 

However, the Germans could not allow a major enemy force to hold land behind the advances of its army. The Germans continued to advance to the north and south of the Ypres Salient and the bulge of Allied men between both represented a major threat to the Germans. 

 

On November 22nd 1914,the Germans started a huge artillery barrage against the town. The old Cloth Hall, which dated from 1260, was set on fire and large parts of the medieval town were destroyed. Civilian casualties were high and may have been worse had it not been for the work of Abbé Delaere and Sister Marguerite who both did what they could to help the homeless and wounded. Despite the devastation of the town, some civilians remained. However, many went to the comparative safety of nearby Poperinge

 

Between April and May 1915, there was a second German barrage against the town. The Cloth Hall was destroyed during this attack along with the historic Collegiate Church of St. Martin. On May 9th, a decision was taken to compulsorily evacuate all civilians from the town. After this date, Ypres was left to the military.

 

In 1916, fighting around Ypres quietened (when compared to 1914 and 1915) and some civilians returned to their town. However, the Third Battle of Ypres in 1917 once again made it exceptionally dangerous to live in the town. In 1918, as a result of a major spring offensive, German forces got to the outskirts of the town on its eastern and southeast flanks. However, British forces held firm and the town was not taken. Ypres was only finally safe in late September 1918 when the last German troops withdrew from the Salient.   

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Ypres WWI 6lbTank Shell case (pg1 SAS)

This is a 6 Pdr shell casing. This is a  shell used by the first British tanks to enter the Battle field at Ypres in WWI.

Dated 1918

Most of the Third Battle of Ypres took place on muddy, swampy terrain, which was terrible for tank warfare.  Cold, heavy rains taking place at the time made things even worse. Tanks were constantly getting stuck in mud. Even though improved Mark IV tanks were now available, they were still poorly suited for the environment.

The original QF 6 Pdr naval gun had turned out to be too long for practical use with the current British heavy tank designs, which mounted guns in the side rather than turrets on top as modern tanks do. The muzzles of the long barrels sometimes dug into the mud or struck obstacles when the vehicle crossed trenches or shell craters. The shortened 6 pounder 6 cwt Mk I of single tube construction was introduced in January 1917 in the 

Mark IV Tank, and may be considered the world's first specialised tank gun. The shortened barrel incurred a reduction in muzzle velocity, but as tank guns in World War I were used against un armoured or lightly armoured targets such as machine gun nests and artillery pieces at relatively short ranges of a few hundred yards, this was not a major disadvantage.

Out of stock

 

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Ypres 1907 Pattern British Bayonet (pg1 SAS)

This a Sanderson made Bayonet recovered in the Ypres area of Belgium.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

The majority of 1907 Pattern bayonets produced during the 1914-1918 war were by the Wilkinson Sword Company, who made over 2.5 million

Other manufacturers were the Royal Small Arms Factory at Enfield, Vickers, Mole, Sanderson and Chapman. The manufacturer's name was stamped on the blade immediately above the cross guard. Other marks impressed on the blade were the Royal Cipher, '1907 indicating the pattern, and the date of acceptance. This latter showed month and year e.g. 6 17 (June 1917). In addition, various inspectors marks are to be found, together with regimental markings.

The 1907 bayonet, while it may have looked impressive on parade, was not a very practical weapon. When fixed to the rifle it altered the rifle's shooting capabilities and in windy conditions it made the rifle more difficult to hold steady. The long blade glittered, even in moonlight. In use, the cross-section of the blade made penetration difficult, though the wound produced was very unpleasant. Withdrawal was often awkward, especially when penetration as deep. Troops were instructed to place a foot on the enemy's body to assist withdrawal and if the bayonet still stuck, training manuals advised that ~a round should be fired to remove the obstruction'

As a hand-held weapon it proved almost useless, patrols and raiding parties preferred knives, clubs and knuckle-dusters. The best uses found by soldiers for the bayonet were wither as a poker or, stuck in a trench wall, as a hook for equipment.

Throughout the war great importance was attached to bayonet training, as typified by Lt. Col. R. B. Campbell's famous lecture on The spirit of the Bayonet' which inspired Siegfried Sassoon's poem 'The Kiss'. Infantry attacks were intended to take the bayonet to the enemy. All other elements in battle existed solely to achieve this end. How effective a bayonet charge actually was is now difficult to say as accounts vary. One thing is certain - to be on the receiving end must have been a terrifying experience.

£180

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Below the Hooge crater in 1915

Hooge Crater 18Lb Shell cap 1 (pg1 SAS)

This the safety cap which covered the 18Lb Shell it sometimes had a leather carrying strap attached, just recently recovered from the Hooge crater area near Ypres.

Hooge is a small village on the Menin Road (the N8), around two miles east of Ypres. The front line of the Salient was here in 1914 and there was fierce fighting in the area over the next three years, during which the village was totally destroyed. The road from Ypres to Hooge leads past the infamous Hellfire corner, once one of the most dangerous spots in the Salient.

A large crater was blown at Hooge in July 1915 by and underground german mine. This occurred during a time of relative quiet on the British part of the Western Front, when few major assaults were made. Nonetheless, the average casualty rate for the British and Commonwealth forces was around 300 per day. Hooge, having been earlier lost, had been retaken in May 1915. On the 2nd of June, Hooge Chateau was lost.

£35

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Hooge Crater 18Lb Shell cap 1 (pg1 SAS)

This the safety cap which covered the 18Lb Shell it sometimes had a leather carrying strap attached, just recently recovered from the Hooge crater area near Ypres.

£45

 

Ypres Shrapnel Soldier (pg1 SAS)

This is a model German soldier made from a piece of shrapnel recovered from the Ypres area. 55mm tall.

£25

 

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Trench Tool 1945 (Pg 1 SAS)

This is British Trench tool. This pattern was used from WWI right through WWII.

£75

 

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Trench art 3"Inch Howitzer shell ash tray (Pg 1 SAS)

A solid brass ash tray made from a 3" Howitzer shell dated 1942.

1942

£75

 

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Trench art 75mm M8 Shell shell ash tray (Pg 1 SAS)

A solid brass lighter  made from a 75mm M8 shell

 

£75

 

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1914 George V Gold Sovereign (pg1 Misc)

This Original World War 1 Gold Sovereign was issued during the Reign of George V in the Year the War broke in Europe. Struck in Solid 22-Carat Gold by the Royal Mint, This Historic Sovereign is a Fitting commemorative to mark the 100th Anniversary of the Start of the First World War

This is London Minted

Grade E.F

This Includes a Gold Ring around the Sovereign for use as a necklace

Within days of the outbreak of World War One in August 1914, the British Treasury was urging the public not to withdraw gold sovereigns from banks. Within a few months the government legislated to the same effect, which meant that the Gold Standard, of which the sovereign was the supreme symbol, had ended.

 

The 1914 gold sovereign was therefore, the last gold sovereign ever to circulate as coinage. It is a year-date that represents an important moment in our history and it is highly sought-after by collectors.

 

This Weighs 7.988 grams of 22kt Gold and measures 22.05mm across

 

More Information About Mint Marks on Sovereigns Visit Here

 

Please View on our Miscellaneous page

  Here is a Collection of Military Styled Crested China

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

 

Arcadian Crested China Ambulance (Pg 1 SAS)

Here we have a WW1 Ambulance Numbered EH139

This is Made by Arcadian China and Has the Ancient seal of Hertford

£35

 

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Shelley Crested China Artillery Gun (Pg 1 SAS)

Here we have a WW1 Artillery Gun

This is Made by Shelley China and Has the City of Aberdeen Crest

Number 340

£40

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Crafton Crested China Artillery Shell (Pg 1 SAS)

Here we have a WW1 Artillery Shell

This is Made by Grafton China and Has the Falmouth Crest

£25

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Arcadian Crested China Colonial Hat (Pg 1 SAS)

Here we have a Art Nuevo Colonial Hat

This is Made by Arcadian China and Has the Tewkesbury Crest

No 657738

£30

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Arcadian Crested China Colonial Scouts Hat (Pg 1 SAS)

Here we have a Art Nuevo Colonial Scouts Hat

This is Made by Diamond China and Has the Bournemouth Crest

 

£30

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Arms Crested China Military Helmet (Pg 1 SAS)

Here we have a WW1 Military Helmet

This is Made by Arms China and Has the Aberayron Crest

£30

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

 

Gemma Crested China Military Cap (Pg 1 SAS)

Here we have a WW1 Military Cap

This is Made by Gemma China and Has the Rothesay Crest

£25

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Crested China Military Cap (Pg 1 SAS)

Here we have a WW1 Military Style Cap

This has the Bruges Crest

£25

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

 

Swan Crested China Military Cap (Pg 1 SAS)

Here we have a WW1 Military Cap

This is Made by Swan China and Has the Aldershot Crest

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

 

Shelley Crested China Military Cap (Pg 1 SAS)

Here we have a WW1 Military Cap

This is Made by Shelley China and Has the Largs Crest

No 176

£25

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

British WW1 60pdr Shell 1906 (Pg 1 SAS)

Here we have a British  60lb shell dated May 1906

This type of Shell  was Used in the British Ordinance BL 60-pounder Field Gun During WWI

There is a Complete  No54 Fuze Attached to the top of the Shell

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

The Ordnance BL 60-pounder was a British 5 inch (127 mm) heavy field gun designed in 1903-05 to provide a new capability that had been partially met by the interim QF 4.7 inch Gun. It was designed for both horse draft and mechanical traction and served throughout the First World War in the main theatres. It remained in service with British and Commonwealth forces in the inter-war period and in frontline service with British and South African batteries until 1942 being superseded by the BL 4.5 inch Medium Gun

Ordnance BL 60-pounder Heavy Field Gun

The N°54 fuze was organized on a time system and a percussion system, both separated and selectionable by a safety pin marked with a 'T' and a 'P' respectively allowing the activation of the movements of the time system pellet firing the time ring powder track, or the percussion pellet that would enable the inertia block movements at arrival, under the action of the shell departure shock.

£200

This Item is Heavy so Please Contact Us for Postage Quote

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

WW1 Officers Trench Periscope (Pg 1 SAS)

Here we Have an Mk.IX Officers Trench Periscope

This is Manufactured by R & J Beck Ltd and is Dated 1918

The Optics on this Periscope are in a Good Condition and Focuses when you turn the Eyepiece

The Wooden Handle and the Brass Body of the Periscope are also in Good Condition

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

£195

 

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2 inch British Mortar (pg1 SAS)

Here we have a Deactivated British 2 inch Mortar. When World War II broke out, 500 2-inch mortars were supplied to the British infantry and among the Commonwealth armies.

Very light and easy to use, it fires explosive shells, smoke shells and illuminating shells and is very successful among English soldiers. 

Several versions of this light mortar emerge, equipping both British cavalry with the Mark III used on tanks as smoke grenade launchers and British Para-troopers with the Mark 8 'Airborne'

It was used on on all battlefields of World War II and especially during the Battle of Normandy, the 2-inch mortar remained in service in the British Army until the 1980s to illuminate and smoke the battlefield.

This was then replaced by the Royal Ordinance 51mm Infantry Mortar model

 

Out of Stock More Wanted Contact Us

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40mm Cannon Shell  (pg1 SAS)

Here we have a 40mm Cannon Shell

This is Dated 1942

The 40mm Cannon was used in Different Applications During the War

The Bofors 40 mm gun, often referred to simply as the Bofors gun is an anti-aircraft/multi-purpose auto cannon designed in the 1930s by the Swedish arms manufacturer AB Bofors. It was one of the most popular medium-weight anti-aircraft systems during World War II, used by most of the western Allies as well as by the Axis powers.

The Vickers Class "S" 40 mm (1.57 in) gun was developed in the late 1930s as an aircraft weapon. The ammunition was based on the 40x158R cartridge case of the naval 2 pdr Anti-aircraft gun (the "Pom-pom"). The weapon was a long-recoil design derived from the 37 mm 1½pdr "COW gun" from Coventry Ordnance Works. The gun was originally intended as a bomber defensive weapon and was tested as such in a turret fitted to a modified Vickers Wellington II. This was not adopted for service, but when the need to attack tanks from the air was identified, the "S" gun was chosen and special armour-piercing ammunition developed.

This Type of Gun was Used on the Hawker Hurricane Mk. IID also known as the "Tank Buster"

  £35

 

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  £175

German 40mm Shell  (pg1 SAS)

Here we have a German Made 40mm Cannon Shell That was Recovered from the Ardennes. It was Made for Use in Captured English and French Bofors GunsThis is Marked

4cm28st

ampAB

70

arx41

It has the Nazi Reichsadler Stamped Clearly with waA270

The Bofors 40 mm gun, often referred to simply as the Bofors gun is an anti-aircraft/multi-purpose auto cannon designed in the 1930s by the Swedish arms manufacturer AB Bofors. It was one of the most popular medium-weight anti-aircraft systems during World War II, used by most of the western Allies as well as by the Axis powers.

The Wehrmacht used a number of Bofors guns which had been captured in Poland and France. The Kriegsmarine also operated some guns obtained from Norway.

In German naval use, the gun was designated the "4 cm Flak 28", and was used aboard the cruisers "Admiral Hipper" and "Prinz Eugen" toward the end of the war. Beginning in 1942, several E-boats were equipped with the Flak 28 to enable them to fight against British MGBs and MTBs on equal terms.

German 4cm Flak 28

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German 40mm Shell 2 (pg1 SAS)

Here we have a German Made 40mm Cannon Shell That was Recovered from the Ardennes. It was Made for Use in Captured English and French Bofors Guns

This is Marked

4cm28st

48F

aguozs43

It is stamped with the Nazi Reichsadler

The Bofors 40 mm gun, often referred to simply as the Bofors gun is an anti-aircraft/multi-purpose auto cannon designed in the 1930s by the Swedish arms manufacturer AB Bofors. It was one of the most popular medium-weight anti-aircraft systems during World War II, used by most of the western Allies as well as by the Axis powers.

The Wehrmacht used a number of Bofors guns which had been captured in Poland and France. The Kriegsmarine also operated some guns obtained from Norway.

In German naval use, the gun was designated the "4 cm Flak 28", and was used aboard the cruisers "Admiral Hipper" and "Prinz Eugen" toward the end of the war. Beginning in 1942, several E-boats were equipped with the Flak 28 to enable them to fight against British MGBs and MTBs on equal terms.

  £175

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German 40mm Shell 3 (pg1 SAS)

Here we have a German Made 40mm Cannon Shell That was Recovered from the Ardennes. It was Made for Use in Captured English and French Bofors Guns

This is Marked

enJN

307

arx43

It is stamped with the Nazi Reichsadler

The Bofors 40 mm gun, often referred to simply as the Bofors gun is an anti-aircraft/multi-purpose auto cannon designed in the 1930s by the Swedish arms manufacturer AB Bofors. It was one of the most popular medium-weight anti-aircraft systems during World War II, used by most of the western Allies as well as by the Axis powers.

The Wehrmacht used a number of Bofors guns which had been captured in Poland and France. The Kriegsmarine also operated some guns obtained from Norway.

In German naval use, the gun was designated the "4 cm Flak 28", and was used aboard the cruisers "Admiral Hipper" and "Prinz Eugen" toward the end of the war. Beginning in 1942, several E-boats were equipped with the Flak 28 to enable them to fight against British MGBs and MTBs on equal terms.

  £175

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German 40mm Shell 4 (pg1 SAS)

Here we have a German Made 40mm Cannon Shell That was Recovered from the Ardennes. It was Made for Use in Captured English and French Bofors Guns

This is Marked

16

enz44

It is stamped with the Nazi Reichsadler

The Bofors 40 mm gun, often referred to simply as the Bofors gun is an anti-aircraft/multi-purpose auto cannon designed in the 1930s by the Swedish arms manufacturer AB Bofors. It was one of the most popular medium-weight anti-aircraft systems during World War II, used by most of the western Allies as well as by the Axis powers.

The Wehrmacht used a number of Bofors guns which had been captured in Poland and France. The Kriegsmarine also operated some guns obtained from Norway.

In German naval use, the gun was designated the "4 cm Flak 28", and was used aboard the cruisers "Admiral Hipper" and "Prinz Eugen" toward the end of the war. Beginning in 1942, several E-boats were equipped with the Flak 28 to enable them to fight against British MGBs and MTBs on equal terms.

  £175

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  £275

German 37mm Flak 18 Shell with Clip (pg1 SAS)

Here we have a German 37mm Flak 18 Shell

It also comes with an Original Storage Clip

The 3.7 cm Flak 18/36/37 was a series of anti-aircraft cannon produced by Nazi Germany that saw widespread service in the Second World War. The cannon was fully automatic and effective against aircraft flying at altitudes up to 4,200 m. The cannon was produced in both towed and self-propelled versions. Having a flexible doctrine, the Germans used their anti-aircraft pieces in ground support roles as well; 37 mm caliber guns were no exception to that. With Germany's defeat, production ceased and, overall, 37 mm caliber anti-aircraft cannon fell into gradual disuse, being replaced by the Bofors 40 mm gun and later, by 35-mm anti-aircraft pieces produced in Switzerland.

Flak 18 AA Cannon

The original 37 mm gun was developed by Rheinmetall in 1935 as the 3.7 cm Flak 18. It had a barrel length of 57 calibers which allowed 4,800 m (15,700 ft) effective ceiling. The armour penetration was considerable when using dedicated ammunition, at 100 m distance it could penetrate 36 mm of a 60°-sloped armour, and at 800 m distance correspondingly 24 mm. It used a mechanical bolt for automatic fire, featuring a practical rate of fire of about 80 rounds per minute .

The Flak 18 was only produced in small numbers, and production had already ended in 1936. Development continued, focusing on replacement of the existing cumbersome dual-axle mount with a lighter single-axle one.The gun's ballistic characteristics were not changed, although the practical rate of fire was raised to 120 rpm

 

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US 60mm Illumination Parachute Mortar (pg1 SAS)

Here we have a 60mm Illumination Round as Used by the United States Army

It was Used in the M2 Mortar as a Pyrotechnic Parachute Flare used in night Missions Requiring Illumination for assistance in Observation

 £175

 

 

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£295

 

WW2 Baby's Gas Mask (pg1 SAS)

This looks like a deep-sea diving helmet but is in fact a gas mask for babies, dating from World War II. In 1938, the British Government gave everyone, including babies, gas masks to protect them in case the Germans dropped poison gas bombs on Britain.

This gas mask was for children up to two years old. The parents placed their baby inside the mask so that the head was inside the steel helmet and the baby could see through the visor. Then they wrapped the canvas part around the baby's body with the straps fastened under its bottom like a nappy, and its legs dangling free below. The canvas had a rubber coating to stop gas seeping through the material, and the straps were tied securely so that the mask was airtight.

There is an asbestos filter on the side of the mask, and this absorbed poisonous gases. Attached to this is a rubber tube shaped like a concertina with a handle. This was pushed back and forth to pump air into the mask. With the baby inside the mask, an adult could start to use the hand pump.

Health Visitors and Child Welfare Centres gave lessons on how to use the mask. Despite instruction courses, few parents were totally happy with encasing their child in an airtight chamber. In fact there was some question over its safety. During demonstrations there were reports that babies fell asleep and became unnaturally still inside the masks! It is likely that the pump didn't push enough air into the mask and the babies came close to suffocating. Luckily, they were never put to the test in a real situation.

 

 

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WW2 British Army Webbing Map Case (pg2 misc)

Here we have a Webbing Map Case used by Officers of the British Army

This is a  G.S No.2 Mk.1

This Case is a pocket, open at the top, a single piece of webbing comprising flap and back, with a turn-back to which a pair of male (spigot) halves of press fasteners are fixed.

To this is stitched a “picture frame” of webbing, with a piece of celluloid stitched into the frame. The sides and bottom are gusseted to accommodate several folded maps. The flap is fitted out for pencils and a protractor, exactly like the first issue.

Seen Below on a Army Mannequin

Click Here to see this in the Misc Page

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£200

Model FA176 Aerial Surveying Altimeter (pg2 misc)

Here we have a Model FA176 Aerial Surveying Altimeter

Serial 7321B

It is in a Good Original Condition

Manufactured by Wallace and Tiernan

It Measures 10" in Diameter

The Body is Made of Aluminium

 It Comes Complete with its Green Canvas Carry Case

This was Used by the US Army Corp of Engineers

During World War II, the Army Corps of Engineers in the European Theatre of Operations was responsible for building countless bridges, including the first and longest floating tactical bridge across the Rhine at Remagen, and building or maintaining roads vital to the Allied advance across Europe into the heart of Germany.

 In the Pacific theatre, the Pioneer troops were formed, a hand-selected unit of volunteer Army combat engineers trained in jungle warfare, knife fighting, and unarmed jujitsu (hand-to-hand combat) techniques. Working in camouflage, the Pioneers cleared jungle and prepared routes of advance and established bridgeheads for the infantry as well as demolishing enemy installations

                      Deactivated and Replica Guns Please note all de activated weapons are now subject  to new EU regulations de activated weapons sold on this website may need new de activation certificates before a sale can be confirmed. If you wish to purchase a weapon please contact me before completing the shopping cart.
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International buyers must check the legality of owning these de activated weapons in their own country as rules vary these are de activated to UK Spec and are certificated.

Browning .30 calibre MG 1938  (pg1 Arm)

This is a superb .30 calibre Browning made in 1938 at Fabrique Nationale de Herstal  Belgium. This gun has a British deactivation certificate and can be legally owned by anyone in the UK. This is a aircraft wing mounted gun hence the solenoid mounted on the top of the gun.

With assistance from firearms engineers at Fabrique Nationale de Herstal  Belgium, the Model 1919 was completely re-engineered into the .30 calibre M2 AN (Army-Navy) aircraft machine gun . The .30 in M2 AN Browning was widely adopted as both a fixed (offensive) and flexible (defensive) weapon on aircraft. Aircraft machine guns required light weight, firepower, and reliability, and achieving all three goals proved a difficult challenge. The receiver walls and operating components of the M2 were made thinner and lighter, and with air cooling provided by the speed of the aircraft, designers were able to reduce the barrel's weight and profile. As a result, the M2 weighed two-thirds that of the 1919 A4, and the lightened mechanism gave it a rate of fire approaching 1,200 rpm (some variants could achieve 1,500 rpm), a necessity for engaging fast-moving aircraft. The M2's feed mechanism had to lift its own loaded belt out of the ammunition box and feed it into the gun, equivalent to a weight of 11 lb (5 kg). In Ordnance circles, the .30 M2 AN Browning had the reputation of being the most difficult-to-repair weapon in the entire US small arms inventory.

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The M2 also appeared in a twin-mount version which paired two M2 guns with opposing feed chutes in one unit for operation by a single gunner, with a combined rate of fire of 2,400 rpm. All of the various M2 models saw service in the early stages of World War II, but were phased out beginning in 1943, as hand-trained defensive machine guns became obsolete for air warfare (the .50 in/12.7 mm M2 Browning and 20 mm automatic cannon had replaced the .30 in as offensive air armament as well). The .30 in M2 aircraft gun was widely distributed to other US allies during and after World War II, and in British and Commonwealth service saw limited use as a vehicle-mounted anti-aircraft or anti-personnel machine gun.

The same basic weapon was also chambered for the British .303 round, and was used as aaircraft gun in fighters and bombers such as the Spitfire and Lancaster.

Click Here to See this on the Armaments Page

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Browning M19111A .45 ACP Pistol (pg1 SAS)

This is a superb reproduction of the Browning M19111A Pistol. It is a full metal  1:1 scale replica. This would make a great addition to any re-enactors kit. The VCR act applies to this piece. Over seas buyers should check the legislation applicable in their country before ordering.  Proof that you are covered by the exceptions in the VCR act will be required. This Reproduction has a removable magazine and it cocks and dry fires

The M1911 pistol originated in the late 1890s as the result of a search for a suitable self-loading (or semi-automatic) pistol to replace the variety of revolvers then in service.

Following its success in trials, the Colt pistol was formally adopted by the Army on March 29, 1911, thus gaining its designation, M1911 (Model 1911).

Battlefield experience in the First World War led to some more small external changes, completed in 1924. The new version received a modified type classification, M1911A1

The M1911A1 changes to the original design consisted of a shorter trigger, cut-outs in the frame behind the trigger, an arched mainspring housing, a longer grip safety spur (to prevent hammer bite), a wider front sight, a shortened hammer spur, and simplified grip checkering (eliminating the "Double Diamond" reliefs)

World War II and the years leading up to it created a great demand. During the war, about 1.9 million units were procured by the U.S. Government for all forces, production being undertaken by several manufacturers, including Remington Rand, Colt and Singer. New M1911A1 pistols were given a parkerized metal finish instead of blueing, and the wood grip panels were replaced with panels made of brown plastic. The M1911A1 was a favoured small arm of both US and allied military personnel during the war, in particular, the pistol was prized by some British commando units and the SOE as well as Commonwealth South African forces

  £80

Please Contact us for a International Shipping Quote

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Bruni 96 Automatic Colt Pistol Blank Firer (pg1 SAS)

Here we have a superb Government Model 8mm Colt Automatic Blank Firer manufactured by Bruni S.R.L

This is Unique One Off and has had Hours of  Beautifully Hand engraved patterns all over the Gun. It is also Engraved  with the American Seal on both sides of the Grip and the Letters GM Engraved on the Slide

This Comes with 2 Magazines, A Spare Wooden Grip and a set of 8mm Blanks all of this is included in a wooden Display Box

The M1911 is a single-action, semi-automatic, magazine-fed, recoil-operated pistol chambered for the .45 ACP cartridge. It served as the standard-issue sidearm for the United States Armed Forces from 1911 to 1986. It was first used in later stages of the Philippine-American War, and was widely used in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. The pistol's formal designation as of 1940 was Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911 for the original model of 1911 or Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911A1 for the M1911A1, adopted in 1924. The designation changed to Pistol, Caliber .45, Automatic, M1911A1 in the Vietnam era.

In total, the U.S. procured around 2.7 million M1911 and M1911A1 pistols in military contracts during its service life. The M1911 was replaced by the 9mm Beretta M9 pistol as the standard U.S. sidearm in October 1986, but due to its popularity among users, it has not been completely phased out. Modernized derivative variants of the M1911 are still in use by some units of the U.S. Army Special Forces, the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps.

 

Designed by John Browning, the M1911 is the best-known of his designs to use the short recoil principle in its basic design. The pistol was widely copied, and this operating system rose to become the preeminent type of the 20th century and of nearly all modern center fire pistols.

The VCR act applies to this piece. Over seas buyers should check the legislation applicable in their country before ordering.  Proof that you are covered by the exceptions in the VCR act will be required.

  £495

Please Contact us for a International Shipping Quote

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  £850

Please Contact us for a International Shipping Quote

STEN 9mm Blank Firer  (pg1 SAS)

Here we have a Sten Sub-Machine Gun Blank Firer

This Fires 9mm Blanks and has a U.K Legal Front Venting System

It can Fire a Single Shot or in Fully Automatic

This is a brilliant Addition to a Paratrooper or British Army Living History Display

The STEN (or Sten gun) was a family of British 9 mm submachine guns used extensively by British and Commonwealth forces throughout World War II and the Korean War. They were notable for having a simple design and very low production cost making them effective insurgency weapons for resistance groups.

STEN is an acronym, from the names of the weapon's chief designers, Major Reginald V. Shepherd and Harold Turpin, and EN for Enfield. Over 4 million Stens in various versions were made in the 1940s.

The Sten emerged while Britain was engaged in the Battle of Britain, facing invasion by Germany. The army was forced to replace weapons lost during the evacuation from Dunkirk while expanding at the same time. Prior to 1941 (and even later) the British were purchasing all the Thompson submachine guns they could from the United States, but these did not begin to meet demand. The American entry into the war at the end of 1941 placed an even bigger demand on the facilities making Thompsons. In order to rapidly equip a sufficient fighting force to counter the Axis threat, the Royal Small Arms Factory, Enfield, was commissioned to produce an alternative.

The Sten used simple stamped metal components and minor welding, which required a minimum of machining and manufacturing. Much of the production could be performed by small workshops, with the firearms assembled at the Enfield site. Over the period of manufacture the Sten design was further simplified: the most basic model, the Mark III, could be produced from five man-hours work. Some of the cheapest versions were made from only 47 different parts. It was distinctive for its bare appearance (just a pipe with a metal loop for a stock), and its horizontal magazine. The Mark I was a more finely finished weapon with a wooden fore grip and handle; later versions were generally more Spartan, although the final version, the Mark V, which was produced after the threat of invasion had died down, was produced to a higher standard.

British Soldier Firing a STEN

The VCR act applies to this piece. Over seas buyers should check the legislation applicable in their country before ordering.  Proof that you are covered by the exceptions in the VCR act will be required.

The Webley Revolver (also known as the Webley Break-Top Revolver or Webley Self-Extracting Revolver) was, in various MKs, the standard issue service pistol for the armed forces of the United Kingdom, the British Empire and the Commonwaelth from 1887 until 1963.

Find webbing for this pistol in Pilot Equipment click here

Deactivated .38 Webley MK IV (pg3 arm)

Used by officers of the RFC and RAF in both WWI and WWII.

The Webley is a top break revolver with automatic extraction; breaking the revolver open for reloading also operates the Extractor, removing the spent cartridges from the cylinder. The Webley Mk I service revolver was adopted in 1887, but it was a later version, the Mk IV, which rose to prominence during the Boer War of 1899 to 1902. The Mk VI, introduced in 1915 during WWI is perhaps the best-known model.

This pistol is fully deactivated and has a certificate, it can be legally owed without a licence in the UK.

Sorry UK mainland only.

Click Here to See this on the Armaments Page

WWII flare gun (pg2 arm)

This is a flare gun used by the RAF pilots and ground crew for signalling in WWII, it is fully deactivated and can be legally owned by anyone in the UK without a licence.  If you want this sent over seas you must be responsible for its shipping and laws applying to this piece in your own Country no responsibility will be accepted for confiscation by customs or authorities overseas. 

Click Here to See this on the Armaments Page

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Film Prop MG (pg2 arm)

Here is a machine gun made as a film prop it is all metal in construction and resembles a 50 call although it has a huge barrel, an interesting display item for someone's wall or collection. If you want this sent over seas you must be responsible for its shipping and laws applying to this piece in your own Country no responsibility will be accepted for confiscation by customs or authorities overseas. 

Click Here to see this on the Armaments page

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18Lb Shell recovered from the Somme (pg1 SAS )

Here we have shell recovered from the Somme Battlefield it is dated 1916.

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Seen under an 18 Lb Gun with its gun crew .

The Quick Firing (QF) 18 Pounder was the principle Field Gun of the British Army in World War One.  The gun saw service in every theatre of the Great War. Its calibre of 84mm and shell weight made it more brutal and destructive than the French 75mm and German 77mm. Its ammunition had the shell combined with the cartridge thus giving it the description of ‘quick firing’.

The gun and its ammunition limber were towed by a team of six light draught horses. A driver was allocated to each two horse team and rode the left horse of each pair. The two wheeled ammunition limber was hooked up to the horses and the trail of the gun was hooked to the limber. Further to this, each gun had two additional ammunition limbers towed by their own team.

The Somme

Fought between July and November 1916, the Battle of the Somme was one of the defining events of the First World War.  The Somme offensive was planned as the major Allied effort on the Western Front for 1916, but the start of a desperate battle between French and German forces at Verdun meant that the British Army assumed the main role. After an intense, week-long artillery bombardment of German positions, the infantry began their advance at 7.30am on the clear midsummer’s morning of 1 July 1916. While there were some gains to the south, in the north the attacking troops struggled to overcome formidable defences, many of which had survived the artillery barrage. By the end of the first day, some 57,000 Commonwealth and 2,000 French soldiers had become casualties – more than 19,000 of whom had been killed.The offensive continued over the following months, and men from every part of Britain and across the Empire took part. Both sides committed huge quantities of manpower and munitions to the struggle.When the offensive was halted in November, more than 1,000,000 Commonwealth, French and German soldiers had been wounded, captured, or killed

  £225

International buyers please contact me for shipping quote

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French 47 mm Char B1 Dunkirk Tank shell (pg1 SAS )

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Here is a complete 47mm SA35 shell dated 1938 used by the Char B1 tank and the Somua tank found at Dunkirk used in the first tank Battles on the Western front after the German invasion of France and the Allied retreat to the Dunkirk pocket in 1940.

A rare shell from one of the defining moments of the start of WWII. It will be supplied with a laminated card listing the details of the shell and a picture of the tank that fired it.

Seen under a captured B1 Char tank.

  £225

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Seen below three members of the 101st airborne at Bastogne.

German Half track Armoured window shutter Battle of Bastogne (pg1 SAS )

Here is an armoured window shutter found at Bastogne from the battle in the winter of 1944 it still retains some of its camo paint a superb piece of History.

The Battle of Bastogne was a battle between American and German forces at the town of Bastogne in Belgium from 20th to the 27th December 1944, it was part of a bigger operation, the Battle of the Bulge. The battle is also known as the Siege of Bastogne. The German forces tried to reach Antwerp harbor, their plan was to reach it before the Allies and bring in more forces to hold it and to defeat the nearing Allied forces. All of the roads in the Ardennes mountain's met at the town of Bastogne, that was one of the main reasons why it was so appealing and important for the Germans.

The siege ended on 27 December 1944 when the American forces holding the town were relived George Patton's 3rd Army.

The US 101st airborne band of Brothers were immortalized in this battle the events of which were featured in the series Band of Brothers.

Seen below a German half track.

  £175

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 The SdKfz 251 (Sonderkraftfahrzeug 251) half-track was an armored fighting vehicle designed and first built by the Hanomag Company during World War II. Used by the Wehrmacht, the Sd.Kfz. 251 was designed to transport the panzergrenadiers of the German mechanized infantry corps into battle. Sd.Kfz. 251s were the most widely produced German half-tracks of the war, with at least 15,252 vehicles and variants produced by various manufacturers, and were commonly referred to simply as “Hanomags” by both German and Allied soldiers.

German Half track SDKFZ complete track link Normandy (pg1 SAS )

Here is a complete track link from a German SDKFZ half track recovered from Normandy from the battle of 1944. Another superb piece of history from the battle for the liberation of Europe in 1944.

Shown below a German SDFKZ halftrack

 £225

International buyers please contact me for shipping quote

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German Half track SDKFZ rubber shoe dated 1941 Normandy (pg1 SAS )

Here is a rubber shoe from a German SDKFZ 8 halftrack found in Normandy

 £55

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German PAK 40 Ammo spacer Bastogne(pg1 SAS )

Here is an ammunition spacer from a German PAK 40 found at Bastogne this piece still has remains of its original yellow paint.

Shown below the German 75mm PAK 40

 £75

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 £375

German AV7 WWI 57 mm tank Shell (pg1 SAS )

Seen under the German AV7 tank

This is an incredibly rare 57mm WWI German Tank shell. Only 20 of these tanks were ever built. The AV7 tank mounted the only 57mm artillery piece used on the Western front in WWI, this shell was originally discovered in Belgium at a flea market . The shell carries the makers flaming bomb mark of the Imperial German maker Patronenfabrik Karlsruhe seen under.

The A7V was armed with six 7.92 mm MG08 machine guns and a 5.7 cm Maxim-Nordenfelt cannon mounted at the front. Some of these cannons were of British manufacture and had been captured in Belgium early in the war; others were captured in Russia in 1918 and appear to have included some Russian-made copies.
  • Some A7Vs were originally built with two forward-facing machine guns instead of a 57 mm gun. Most were converted to carry a 57 mm before entering service. Number 501, Gretchen, took part in the action at St. Quentin before her 57 mm was fitted.
 
Following the appearance of the first British tanks on the Western Front, in September 1916, the German War Ministry formed a committee, under the auspices of its General War Department, Section 7, Transportation  to investigate tank development.

One hundred chassis were ordered in early 1917, 10 to be finished as fighting vehicles with armored bodies, and the remainder as the cargo carriers. The number to be armored was later increased to 20. They were used in action from March to October 1918, and were the only tanks produced by Germany in World War I to be used in combat.

The project to design and build the first German tank was placed under the direction of Joseph Vollmer, one of Germany's foremost automobile designers. It was to weigh around 30 tons, be capable of crossing ditches up to 1.5 meters wide, have armament including cannon at the front and rear as well as several machine-guns, and reach a top speed of at least 12 km/h. The running gear was based on the Holt tractor copied from examples loaned by the Austrian Army. After initial plans were shared with the army in December 1916, the design was extended to be a universal chassis that could be used as a base for both a tank and unarmored over-land vehicle cargo carriers.

The first prototype was completed  at Berlin-Marienfelde and tested on 30 April 1917. A wooden mockup of a final version was completed in May 1917 and demonstrated in Mainz with 10 tons of ballast to simulate the weight of the amour. During final design, the rear-facing cannon was removed and the number of machine-guns was increased to six. The first pre-production A7V was produced in September 1917, followed by the first production model in October 1917. The tanks were given to Assault Tank Units 1 and 2, founded on 20 September 1917, each with five officers and 109 NCOs and soldiers

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 £175

German Marder 2 tank Destroyer track Kursk (pg1 SAS )

This superb piece of history is from a Marder 2 tank destroyer recovered from Russia from the Kursk Battlefield and is dated 1942 it includes an attached ice cleat to give added traction in snow and ice. The vicious battle of the winter campaign took place in 1943.

Seen under a Marder II Tank Destroyer on the Eastern front.

A total of 576 German Marder II Tank Destroyer were built between June 1942 June 1943 and a further 75 were converted from damaged Panzer II tanks. The Marder II remained in service with the German Army until the end of the War and served on all fronts.

Armament: 7.5mm Pak 40 anti-tank gun & x1 7.92mm MG
Armour: 35mm Steel
Crew: 3
Dimensions: Length 6.36m / Width 2.28m / Height 2.2m
Weight: 10.8 tonne
Engine: 140hp Maybach 6 cylinder Petrol
Top Road Speed: 40 km/h
Operational Range: 190 km

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German maxim machine gun Spanner Somme (pg1 SAS )

Here we have a spanner for a Maxim machine gun this was recovered from the Somme battlefield . Marked in very nice condition.

 £60

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German MG 34/42 ammo loader Normandy. (pg1 SAS )

 

Here we have an ammo loader for the MG 34/42 recovered from Normandy. The most advance MG of its time with an extremely rapid fire it caused carnage among the Allied troops in Normandy.

 £75

 

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 £155

 

German Panzer II Tank track link Ardennes (pg1 SAS )

Here we have a track link from a Panzer II Tank it was found in the Ardennes from the German invasion of France in 1940.

The Panzer II Light tank was the second German tank to enter mass production during the period of German rearmament in the 1930s. Unlike the Panzer 1, it had always been intended to use the Panzer II in combat, but not to the extent that eventually happened. A combination of slow progress on the development of the Panzer III and Panzer IV and the unexpectedly rapid expansion of the Panzer forces from 1936 meant that the Panzer II was the most important German tank at the beginning of the Second World War, and still the most numerous at the start of the offensive in the west in May 1940.

The Germans won their most significant victories with these generally un-regarded light tanks, and suffered their defeats with the more famous heavier tanks.

The full designation of the tank was the PanzerKampfWagen II or Armoured Fighting Vehicle II. This was abbreviated to Pk.Kpfw II, PzKw II or Panzer II. It also received the Ordnance Department designation SD Ktz 121 and the codename LaS 100.

The Panzer II was similar in layout to the earlier Panzer I. Like all German tanks the engine was at the rear, with the drive wheels at the front. The turret was offset slightly to the left and carried one 20mm cannon and one 7.92mm machine gun. The 20mm gun could fire high explosive or amour piercing rounds, so the Panzer II did have a limited ability to fight other tanks.

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You can see the position of the armoured window in the pictures under.

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 £355

 

German Tiger tank Armoured window Normandy(pg1 SAS )

This is a superb piece an armoured window from the legendary Tiger tank, this piece was found in Normandy and almost certainly  came from one of Hitler's  tank battalions held in reserve who could possibly have repelled the invasion had they been brought into action sooner. Apparently Hitler was asleep when the invasion happened and his staff were too frightened to wake him in time too get his personal order to release the tanks. The armoured glass is still intact and quite clear the picture under was taken through the glass of our Spitfire you can see it gives quite a wide field of vision.

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Below the 101st SS Heavy Tank Battalion., Normandy, 1944

THE PANZERKAMPFWAGEN VI or Tiger tank was never a common sight on the battlefields of World War Two.

During the roughly two years that the vehicle was in production, only 1,347 were built – a number that is lower than the monthly production figures for the M4 Sherman and Soviet T34 at the height of the war. Any other fighting machine that was produced in such limited numbers would be quickly forgotten, but the Tiger’s impressive combat performance has left a mark on history that far outweighs the tank’s strategic significance.

Everything about the Tiger was over-engineered (to an almost absurd degree). Its 88-mm main gun was so formidable that shells often blasted straight through enemy tanks and came out the other side. Its amour was so thick a crew could more or less park in front of an enemy anti-tank gun with little fear of harm. Its engine was so powerful that the 54-ton hulk was able to keep pace with tanks less than half its weight.

And in the hands of an expert commander a lone Tiger could knock out dozens of enemy machines in a single engagement.

 

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 £255

SS Totenkopf Panzer 4 type 5B track link Modlin Warsaw (pg1 SAS )

This piece was recovered from Modlin near Warsaw the scene of the Warsaw uprising in August 1944. On the 1st of August , the Polish Home army launched the Warsaw uprising. A column of Totenkopf Tiger tanks were caught up in the fighting and several were lost. The Totenkopf itself was not involved in the suppression of the uprising instead guarding the front lines, and fighting off several Red Army attacks into the cities eastern suburbs. In several Battles near the town on Modin in mid August the Totenkopf , fighting alongside the 5th SS panzer division Wiking and the Herman Goring Panzer division destroyed the Soviet 3rd tank Korps. The terrain around Modin was excellent for armour and the Totenkopf Panzers exploited this too their advantage engaging Soviet tanks from a range where the superiority of the German optics and the 75mm high velocity gun gave the panzers the edge over the Soviets T 34s.

Seen under the Panzer IV Tank

International buyers please contact me for shipping quote

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SS Totenkopf Panzer 4 type 5B track link Modlin Warsaw 2 (pg1 SAS )

This track is the same as the above but in slightly better condition.

 £275

 

Click on the picture to enlarge

£35

 

US Heavy artillery spanner (pg1 SAS )

This piece of history was found near Bastogne from the scene of the fighting during the Battle of the Bulge.

Below an American towed artillery piece, nicknamed "Long Tom", is being set up for firing in the Ardennes - Battle of the Bulge, December

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Stuart tank 7th armored div 1944

£155

 

US Stuart tank track link Normandy (pg1 SAS )

Here is a track link from a US Stuart tank this piece was found in Normandy from the battle in the summer of 1945.

The United States Army began operating the new Light Tank M3 vehicles in Mar 1941. Before the Americans took them to combat,  as the United States would not enter WW2 until the end of that year, they exported them to British and Commonwealth forces that were already involved in war with Germany and Italy. The British nicknamed these American light tanks General Stuart, after the American Civil War general; 170 British General Stuart light tanks took part in Operation Crusader in North Africa. British tank crews complained of the ineffective 37-millimeter guns and the short range, although they were liked for the high speed and mechanical reliability. After mid-1942, the British largely kept them out of direct combat missions, using them as reconnaissance, transport, and command vehicles instead. The Russians also received M3 tanks; though they were put in use, the Russians generally disliked these light tanks, citing logistical complications with fuel (use of high octane fuel rather than the more typical diesel usage among Russian tanks), engine sensitivity of impurities in fuel, and use of narrow tracks (which tend to sink into snow more often than tanks with wider tracks).

Production of the M3 light tanks lasted from Mar 1941 through Oct 1943. To alleviate the demand on the aircraft industry, beginning in Oct 1943 the M3 design saw its use of aircraft radial engines change to automobile engines made by Cadillac. This new variant, designed M5, continued to be built through 1944. Over 25,000 vehicles were built during this time. M3 and M5 light tanks remained in service in the United States through the post-WW2 period, and were sold to countries friendly to the United States, such as France, Nationalist China, and Tito's partisan forces in Yugoslavia.

 

                              

 


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