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This section contains 100% genuine relics of the great aerial conflict Second World War including the Battle of Britain. We have added this section due to numerous enquires for this sort of personal history. All items will have been legally recovered and supported with authentification. Many parts listed in other sections of the site can be linked to the correct aircraft types. The following pieces listed on these pages are from aircraft crash sites and details of the, Squadron, Pilot ,exact date, combat details, aircraft type, and serial number. In most cases if not already supplied it will be possible for a small fee to receive copies of the Squadron Operational record book and official combat reports which are available from the record office at Kew. We have found that its allot more economical to employ the services of a professional researcher. Its costs around £50 to locate and take copies of original documents. Obviously these are crash relics and will not be in a usable condition, its the history that counts and it is possible for example to build up a collection of a Battle of Britain items from start of the battle until the end . Spitfire Spares does not support the recovery of wreckage from anything classified as a War grave or any recovery not fully compliant with the current legislation. Respect for the Brave aircrew is paramount and we will not offer or purchase any personal items recovered from aircrew killed in action serving their Country.  

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Click on the picture for Rocket relics

You will receive a certificate which each piece purchased.

Joseph P. Kennedy Jr, the oldest child of Joseph and Rose Kennedy, died on 12 August 1944, flying an experimental drone aircraft.

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The Joseph Patrick Kennedy drone Engine part (pg1 Pwr)

This piece is from a Pratt and Whitney Twin Wasp R-1830 Fitted to a Liberator. This piece was recovered from Deadmans Covert in Suffolk England.

Point A is Blythburgh where the aircraft blew up and point B is where the piece was recovered. By Road it is a distance of about 1.5 miles but as the crow fly's  considerably less.

 Whilst I cannot say as a 100% certainty that this was from Kennedys B24 Drone the fact that it is from a B24 Engine piece and the location evidence is extremely strong and as far as my research goes I can say with confidence that no other B24s went down in this location.

Top Secret telegram to General Carl Andrew Spaatz from General Jimmy Doolittle, August 1944 reporting the failure of the mission:

ATTEMPTED FIRST APHRODITE ATTACK TWELVE AUGUST WITH ROBOT TAKING OFF FROM FERSFIELD AT ONE EIGHT ZERO FIVE HOURS PD ROBOT EXPLODED IN THE AIR AT APPROXIMATELY TWO THOUSAND FEET EIGHT MILES SOUTHEAST OF HALESWORTH AT ONE EIGHT TWO ZERO HOURS PD WILFORD J. WILLY CMA SR GRADE LIEUTENANT AND JOSEPH P. KENNEDY SR GRADE LIEUTENANT CMA BOTH USNR CMA WERE KILLED PD COMMANDER SMITH CMA IN COMMAND OF THIS UNIT CMA IS MAKING FULL REPORT TO US NAVAL OPERATIONS PD A MORE DETAILED REPORT WILL BE FORWARDED TO YOU WHEN INTERROGATION IS COMPLETED

On 13th June 1944 the Nazis had begun firing the first of their Vergeltungswaffen (“retaliatory” “reprisal” ) weapons at England. The V1 pilotless jet aircraft was a relatively crude affair but Allied intelligence was aware that more sophisticated rocket weapons were also under development, designated the V2. A number of the launch sites had been identified in occupied France and it was a priority programme of the heavy bombers to put them out of action. The Allies were not aware that there was a third Vergeltungswaffen weapon under secret development – the V3 pump gun.

It was fortuitous therefore that Allied reconnaissance had identified the site of the V3 gun in northern France, even though they believed at the time that it was a V2 launch site. It was placed on the priority target list in any event.

The Mimoyecques site had already been attacked by RAF Bomber Command but such was the concern about the potential threat posed by the V2 that it was decided that further attacks were needed, in an attempt to completely obliterate it. It was now decided to use one of the Allied secret weapons in order to attack the site with a massive explosive force.

Under development were early ‘drones’ – pilotless aircraft. At this stage all that the Allies were developing were remotely controlled conventional aircraft. The remote control only operated once the aircraft was in the air – so pilots were needed to get them airborne. They then had to parachute out of what was effectively a flying bomb – ‘the Baby’ under the control of other – ‘Mother’ – aircraft flying alongside.

Experienced volunteer pilots were needed for what was a dangerous experiment. Joseph P. Kennedy Jr was a US Navy pilot who had been flying the B-24 Liberator in anti U-boat operations from England.

Lt. McCarthy of the 8th Combat Camera Unit was an eye witness in a US Mosquito aircraft monitoring the experimental flight:

the Baby just exploded in mid-air as we neared it and I was knocked halfway back to the cockpit. A few pieces of the Baby came through the plexi glass nose and I got hit in the head and caught a lot of fragments in my right arm. I crawled back to the cockpit and lowered the wheels so that Bob could make a quick emergency landing.

Although officially no explanation for the explosion was ever recorded a documentary that I watched came to the conclusion that a switch in the aircraft shorted possibly static  setting off the explosives.

Joe's squadron, flying in the bitter winter over the Bay of Biscay, suffered heavy casualties, and by the time Joe had completed his designated number of missions in May, he had lost his former co-pilot and a number of close friends.

“Joe refused his proffered leave and persuaded his crew to stay on for D-day. They flew frequently during June and July, and at the end of July they were given another opportunity to go home. He felt it unfair to ask his crew to stay on longer, and they returned to the United States. He remained. For he had heard of a new and special assignment for which volunteers had been requested which would require another month of the most dangerous type of flying.

“…It may be felt, perhaps, that Joe should not have pushed his luck so far and should have accepted his leave and come home. But two facts must be borne in mind. First, at the time of his death, he had completed probably more combat missions in heavy bombers than any other pilot of his rank in the Navy and therefore was pre-eminently qualified, and secondly, as he told a friend early in August, he considered the odds at least fifty-fifty, and Joe never asked for any better odds than that.

This piece is available in the Power Plant section link here

15 Squadron Emblem

Short Stirling mk. III

Stirling Mk III BK657

The following relics are  from Short Stirling III Serial Number BK657

It Crashed at 02.15 on the morning of 27th April 1943 at Portengen near Utrecht in Holland

Stirling BK657 took off from RAF Mildenhall in Sussex at 18.46 on the 26th April 43 on a bombing mission to Duisburg

It was on the outbound journey when it was shot down by a Night fighter.

Pilot Officer R. Watson was injured during the crash and spent his time in hospital before being repatriated on the SS Leticia. He arrived at Liverpool on the 2nd February 1945

Sergeant W.A.Spencer, Sergeant W.A.Dyson, Sergeant H.L.Phillips and Flight Sergeant K.L.Bearnes were all taken as Prisoners of War

Sergeant C.M.M.Mora managed to survive the crash and escaped

 Sergeant G.C.Whittaker is believed to have bailed out but he died of his injuries before he could be found. He is Buried at the Amersfoort General Cemetery

He is Buried in Plot 13. Row 5. Grave 98

The Recovery of Stirling BK657

 

Please Click on the Pictures to Enlarge

Stirling Mk III BK657 Tacho Drive Generator (page 4 relics 1)

Here we have the Tacho Drive Generator that was connected to the engine to show the engine revs in the cockpit

It still as the cable that was attached to rev counter in the cockpit.

£75

         

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Stirling Mk III BK657 Oxygen Manifold (page 4 relics 2)

Here we have a Mk. 1.A Oxygen Manifold. Ref No: 6D/515

This is in good condition for a crash relic and you can clearly see the Reference number and the Air Ministry Crown

£65

         

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Stirling Mk III BK657 Fuel Sender Unit (page 4 relics 3)

Here is the Fuel Sender Unit. It is still attached to some fuel lines and pipes

The Serial Number of the Sender Unit is 30080/41

£135

         

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Stirling Mk III BK657 Fuel Tank Sender Unit (page 4 relics 4)

Here is what I believe to be is the Fuel Tank Sender Unit as used to tell how much fuel is in the tank.

The part number reads 3-2084.02-02

£55

         

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Stirling Mk III BK657 Oxygen Connector 1 (page 4 relics 5)

Here is a brass connector as used in the oxygen system

£55

         

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Stirling Mk III BK657 Oxygen Connector 2 (page 4 relics 6)

Here is a brass connector as used in the oxygen system

£45

           

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Stirling Mk III BK657 Oxygen Connector 3 (page 4 relics 7)

Here is a brass connector as used in the oxygen system

£45

         

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Stirling Mk III BK657 Electrical Connector 1 (page 4 relics 8)

Here is a brass connector as used in the Electrical system

£45

         

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Stirling Mk III BK657 Electrical Connector 2 (page 4 relics 9)

Here is a brass connector as used in the Electrical system

£35

         

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Stirling Mk III BK657 Actuator (page 4 relics 10)

This is an actuator that was used in the aircraft

An actuator is a type of motor that is responsible for moving or controlling a mechanism

£55

            

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Stirling Mk III BK657 Control Assy (page 4 relics 11)

Here is part of the control Assy of BK657

It has Part Number ST681103/4 on the bracket attached and FB95678-S/3 on one of the arms

£275

         

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No.211 Time Fuze (page 4 relics 12)

Here is a No. 211 TimeFuze Used in the 25 Pounder QF Field Gun

This was found along with the Wreckage of BK657

The setting numbers can be clearly seen on the side of the fuse

£55

         

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Stirling Mk III BK657 Electrical Plug (page 4 relics 13)

Here is a Plug from the electrical system of BK657

Part Number 1239-1-2

£35

         

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Herbert Blockberger ME109 Frame (page 4 relics 14)

This is a Frame from ME109 Bf109G-5 (W.N . 27107) which was flow by Uffz Herbert Blockberger

Shot down by fighters, this aircraft dived steeply into the ground in the path of the Allied invasion of France. Not surprisingly it was not recovered. A small group of British enthusiasts were helped by a Frenchman, who knew of the wreck, to locate and recover the complete airframe and the remains of the pilot who’s identity was at first unknown. Fortunately sufficient evidence was found to identify him as Uffz Herbert Blockberger.

We purchased this and other parts direct from the licence holder who excavated the aircraft. None of this aircraft has been released for sale any where else, the previous owner who has excavated several aircraft over many years is now selling his collection to finance other projects.

£125

         

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Waco Glider relic from D Day (page 4 relics 16)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£25

         

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P47 Thunderbolt 42-26256 airframe and engine parts (page 4 relics 17)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£75

         

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Allied tent remains recovered in Normandy (page 4 relics 20)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£55

          

 

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Battle of Britain JU 87 Stuka 5518 Engine  pipe work and radiator parts (page 4 relics 21)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£95

          

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Luftwaffe Medical equipment bag (page 4 relics 23)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£75

          

 

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B26 D Day Rubber fuel tank liner (page 4 relics 25)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£75

          

 

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Battle of Britain Hurricane airframe fabric (page 4 relics 26)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£55

           

 

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Battle of Britain Hurricane P2728 Airframe and engine parts (page 4 relics 27)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

Out of stock

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Battle of Britain Dornier 17 Airframe and engine parts (page 4 relics 28)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£75

           

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Battle of Britain JU 88 of KG/30 Bolts 7.92 Bullet cases and airframe parts (page 4 relics 32)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£75

       

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Battle of Britain JU 88 Wk nos 3168 Engine pipe work and airframe parts (page 4 relics 33)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£75

       

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B17 air see rescue life boat inspection panel (page 4 relics 34)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£155

       

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Battle of Britain Spitfire BF 109 E wk nos 1606 of 3/JG3 Airframe and engine part  (page 4 relics 35)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£55

       

 

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Battle of Britain JU 88 Stuka Wk nos 5518 Engine parts and two engine labels (page 4 relics 36)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£125

        

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US Waco glider Operation Market Garden Groesbeek Holland 1944 Airframe, control parts and fabric. (page 4 relics 38)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£125

        

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FW 190 shot down in Germany in 1944 Airframe and rubber dingy parts (page 4 relics 39)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£95

         

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Avro Lancaster LM 650 44 Squadron shot down Germany 1944 (page 4 relics 40)

  Please enlarge the picture to get the full details.

£95

         

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Henry James Merchant joined the RAFVR about December 1937 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up on 1st September 1939, he arrived at 12 Group Pool Aston Down on 10th February 1940.

After converting to Hurricanes he was posted to No. 1 Squadron in France but probably did not join it until 14th May 1940.


On 31st July Merchant shared in damaging a Do17. On 23rd August he ran out of fuel on a night patrol and crashed at Hunts Farm, Withyham in Hurricane P2980. He was slightly injured.


On the 30th he claimed a He111 destroyed and on the 31st a Me110 destroyed and another damaged.

In a combat over Chelmsford his aircraft was set alight and Merchant baled out. He was admitted to Halstead Cottage Hospital with burns. His Hurricane, V7375, crashed and burned out on Ovington Hall Farm, Halstead. He rejoined the squadron on 8th October.


From 26th November to 24th December 1940 Merchant was at CFS Upavon for an instructors course on Masters and Tutors.

His subsequent service is currently undocumented until he was commissioned in August 1941.

Merchant was released from the RAF in 1945 as a Flight Lieutenant.

Battle of Britain Hurricane V 7375 shot down 31st August 1940 Sergeant H J Merchant (page 4 relics 44)

Please Click on the Picture to Enlarge

£75

         

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Henry James Merchant joined the RAFVR about December 1937 as an Airman u/t Pilot. Called up on 1st September 1939, he arrived at 12 Group Pool Aston Down on 10th February 1940.

After converting to Hurricanes he was posted to No. 1 Squadron in France but probably did not join it until 14th May 1940.


On 31st July Merchant shared in damaging a Do17. On 23rd August he ran out of fuel on a night patrol and crashed at Hunts Farm, Withyham in Hurricane P2980. He was slightly injured.


On the 30th he claimed a He111 destroyed and on the 31st a Me110 destroyed and another damaged.

In a combat over Chelmsford his aircraft was set alight and Merchant baled out. He was admitted to Halstead Cottage Hospital with burns. His Hurricane, V7375, crashed and burned out on Ovington Hall Farm, Halstead. He rejoined the squadron on 8th October.


£125

       

Hurricane V 7375 shot down 31st August 1940 Sergeant H J Merchant (page 4 relics 46)

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Please note there is no suggestion these bullet cases came from this aircraft the story has been added for interest and to enhance the display of these Battle of Britain dated German shell cases.

Above the 7.62 MG 81 in situ in a JU 88

£55

       

 

7.62mm Bullet cases dated 1939 and 1940 (page 4 relics 48)

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