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Temperature gauges

RAF temperature gauges are generic instruments, the aircraft shown in our adds did use the temp gauges shown but they may of coarse been used in a different type of aircraft. Voltage is some indicator of use, Fighters usually used a 12 Volt gauge where as Twin Engine or bigger Bomber aircraft generally used 24 volt. If you are not sure what Temp gauge you require then please contact us and I will do my best to advise you on the most suitable purchase.

Use the links under to navigate the instrument pages

Page 1 Instruments home.  Page 2 Airspeed indicators.    Page 3 Altimeters.    Page four Boost gauges.    Page five Clocks and compasses. Page Six Climb and descend.          Page 7 Directional indicators  

   Page 8 Fuel gauges    Page 9 Flap Indicators Page 10 Brake Gauges  Page 11 Oxygen gauges  Page 12 Pressure gauges   Page13 Revolution Counters   Page 14 temperature gauges

  Page 15 Turn and slip and artificial Horizon  Page 16 Undercarriage indicators  Page 17 Trim gauges  Page 18 Volt and Ammeter

Engine temp Gauge (Page 14 temp gauges 1)

Engine temp gauge used aircraft with radial engines. These were fitted to Canadian built MK X Lancaster's engineers panel when Radial engines were fitted. Would also have been used in Sterling and Halifax. Used in early jets to pick up the temperature of the engine from multiple external sensors in the same way as it was used on Big Radial engines.

£45

Click on pictures to enlarge

These should  be serviceable subject to the normal checks.

New Radiator Temp gauge (Page 14 temp gauges 4)

A very exiting find. Discovered during demolition work in an old underground store. As new wartime Radiator temperature Gauge complete in its original box having never left the factory. Superb and untouched for sixty years this gauge is a 12volt FIGHTER version and was discovered only 20 miles from Castle Bromwich England's main Spitfire factory.   With these two facts in mind its almost certain these were destined for Castle Bromwich and a Spitfire. Perhaps sealed by bomb damage.  he Castle Bromwich Aerodrome Factory, built in 1940, is now occupied by the Jaguar car plant.  The Factory closed in December 1945.   It had built 15634 Spitfires including Seafire production, and a 305 contribution to Lancaster production. The first of which was completed in late 1943. I have a small quantity available.

A/M 6A/1480 dated 1943

£45 each

Click on pictures to enlarge

New Black Radiator Temp gauge (Page 14 temp gauges 5)

A very exiting find. Discovered during demolition work in an old underground store. As new wartime Radiator temperature Gauge complete in its original box having never left the factory. Superb and untouched for sixty years this gauge is a 12volt FIGHTER version and was discovered only 20 miles from Castle Bromwich England's main Spitfire factory. With these two facts in mind its almost certain these were destined for Castle Bromwich and a Spitfire. Perhaps sealed by bomb damage. I see no reason that these should not be serviceable subject to the normal checks.

A/M 6A/1480 dated 1944

£45 each

Click on pictures to enlarge

Senders for these available in electrical section link here

 Yellow Oil Temp gauge (Page 14 temp gauges 6)

 This gauge is a 24 volt Bomber version

A/M 6A/1478

Dated 1942

 24 volt

£45

New Oil Temp gauge 24v (Page 14 temp gauges 7)

This is an old new stock Oil Temperature gauge in excellent unused boxed condition. Most Flying Spitfires today have converted to 24Volt so this gauge would suit an operational aircraft. Also suitable for Wartime late Mk Spitfire panels or of coarse bombers which generally used 24Volts. If you just want it for display and prefer black gauges it will sit alongside our black radiator temp gauge shown above. Its slightly different with green marked scale. Marked with Air ministry Crown.

A/M 6A/1479  last check 1953

24 Volt

£65 each

Senders for these available in electrical section link here

Click on the picture to enlarge.

Carb Temp Gauge (Page 14 temp gauges 9)

 

Wartime gauge with Kings crown.

Dated 1942

Out of stock more wanted contact me.

Click on pictures to enlarge

 

Early round Radiator Temp Gauge with capillary 2 dated 1936 (Page 14 temp gauges 12)

A very early Classic early Radiator Temperature gauge with complete capillary, it has short capillary so for fighter use.  Could have been fitted to an early Hurricane or in the early MK's of Spitfire and of coarse other RAF Wartime fighters. I have immersed the sender in hot water and the needle moves

Mk I Hurricane

£295 Reserved

 

Click on the picture to enlarge.

Cylinder head temp gauge (Page 14 temp gauges 16)

Used with air cooled radial engines.

 

£45

Brown Oil Temp gauge (Page 14 temp gauges 17)

Classic oil temp gauge in a brown wood effect case has a service date of 1943 and is in good original condition.

24  Volt

Click on the picture to enlarge.

£65

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

Luftwaffe He 219 A JU 88 air temp gauge (Page 14 temp gauges 20)

This is outside air temperature gauges used on the HE 219 A and the JU 88 and probably other wartime German aircraft.

The Heinkel He 219 was an excellent German night-fighter for her time, limited in part by her inherent complexity as well as internal dissention within the German authoritative ranks.

The Junkers Ju 88 was one of the most versatile and effective combat aircraft of World War II. Its closest counterparts on the Allied side were the  Mosquito and Beaufighter. The German aircraft was larger and slower, but nevertheless very effective. 14,676 were built, including a staggering 104 prototypes for its 60 different versions.

£125

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

 

 

 

£355

 

Luftwaffe FW 200 Dual engine and exhaust temp gauge (Page 14 temp gauges 21)

This is in superb condition and was fitted to the FW 200 Condor, He 177, HE 274, he 277 JU 390, JU 488 and DO 26

FW 200 Condor

After the fall of France in 1940, Germany attempted to strangle Britain into submission by attacking the Atlantic Convoys, which brought much need supplies and war materiel from the USA and Canada. While the U-boats attacked from beneath the seas, the Germans modified a civilian airliner to create the Fw-200 Condor to attack from the skies. By the summer of 1941, the Condor attacks had succeeded to the extent that Winston Churchill called them ‘the scourge of the Atlantic’.

HE 177

The He177 only made it to production through dogged courage and perseverance, and those two factors were the only thing that allowed it to reach large production numbers. In defense of the aircraft however, it could be said that all its troubles originated from a (absolutely asinine) 1938 requirement for a proposed heavy bomber/anti-shipping aircraft, that should also be capable of dive-bombing! So, the main problem of the He-177 was created: In an effort to reduce drag, the engineers decided that they would use coupled engines. (basically four engines, stuck together into two nacelles) These coupled engines would enter record books as being the most fire-prone engines in normal cruising flight. Out of the eight prototypes, six crashed. And of the 35 pre-production A-0s, (built for the most part by Arado Handelsgesellschaft, Warnemunde) a large number had to be written off due to take-off swings or in-flight fires.

Dornier 26

The Dornier Do 26 was constructed for Lufthansa to meet the requirement of a trans-Atlantic mail and passenger carrier. Upon the outbreak of war, the Luftwaffe took charge of all six Do 26s and utilized them for operations in the fiords of Norway, as well as general patrol and staff transport duties. In service, it was armed with a 20mm MG151 in the nose turret and MG15s in the beam hatch positions and mid-fuselage blisters. No bombs or depth charges were carried. The boats were quite weakly armed and slow, so they were quickly relegated to behind-the-lines duties, where general attrition and lack of spares caused them to fade from service.

Oil Thermometer transmitter 6A1089 ( Nos 27 Electrical Misc pg 1)

New old stock very hard to find oil temp senders for the standard square electrical oil temp gauges

Click on the pictures to enlarge them.

Click Here for Link to Electrical

 

 

 

Use the links under to navigate the instrument pages

Page 1 Instruments home.  Page 2 Airspeed indicators.    Page 3 Altimeters.    Page four Boost gauges.    Page five Clocks and compasses. Page Six Climb and descend.          Page 7 Directional indicators     Page 8 Fuel gauges   Page 9 Flap Indicators  Page 10 Brake Gauges  Page 11 Oxygen gauges

Page 12 Pressure gauges   Page13 Revolution Counters    Page 14 temperature gauges    Page 15 Turn and slip and artificial Horizon

Page 16 Undercarriage indicators  Page 17 Trim gauges  Page 18 Volt and Ammeter

 

 


       

 


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