Welcome to SpitfireSpares.com airframe section

 

To find Parts and services available click on the buttons

Search

AirFrame

Armaments

Books

Canopy

Controls

Deact Firearms

Electrical

Fuel

Gun Sights

Hydraulics

Instruments

Lighting

Jet Parts

Miscellaneous

Oxygen

Pilot Equiptment

Propellers

RFC Propellers

Power Plant

Parts Manuals

Radio

Rockets

Relics

Replica aircraft

SAS and Militaria

Undercarridge

Featured services and information

Aircraft For Hire

Aircraft recoveries

Aircrew

Refrence Section

Video

Visit to USA

Visit to Arnhem

 

 

HomeContact UsDelivery PolicyPayment OptionsTerms & ConditionsView Cart

 


    1 2 3

 

FW 190

.

Click on the picture to enlarge

FW 190 flaps shown in situ

Click on the picture to enlarge

The FW-190 has a different construction method than conventional period wings. The top and bottom skins are one piece, while the ribs are riveted in halves.

Fw 190A-1

With a 1600 horsepower BMW 801C engine powering a three-bladed variable pitch propeller, the Fw 190A-1 made a top speed of 388 MPH. The wide-track landing gear folded in toward the fuselage, was extra strong to accommodate future weight growth, and offered good stability on the ground. The bubble-style plexiglass canopy offered excellent visibility in all directions; when it proved difficult to jettison, an ejection mechanism was devised. The Fw 190 was built in a modular fashion, for easy repair and replacement in rough field conditions.

For weaponry, the Fw 190A-1 carried four rifle-caliber machine guns, two in the cowling and two in the wing roots; all fired through the propeller arc.

In September 1941, the Fw 190A-1 first appeared in battle against the RAF. At first, the British weren't sure what they were facing. They soon found out, as the FW 190 bested the Spitfire Mark V. However, the four 7.9mm machine guns were not adequate firepower; an upgrade to heavier armament had been planned as soon as the guns were available.

Fw 190A-2

The next version, the Fw 190A-2, replaced the machine guns in the wing root with belt-fed 20mm cannon. Some A-2's added two more 20mm cannon further outboard in the wings. Oddly, these were drum-fed guns, whose ammunition was incompatible with the cannon in the wing roots.

An uprated BMW 801C-2 engine powered the A-2, which began to be delivered in the fall of 1941.

Spitfire MK IX

The MK IX spitfire the most prolific of all Spitfire Mks was a direct consequence of the introduction of the FW 190. The MK IX was never meant to be a production model the MK V had planned to be followed by the MK VIII. The FW 190 easily out performed the Spitfire MK V and so MK Vs were converted to use the new Merlin 66 and rushed into service . The new MK IX was a match for the newly introduced FW 190. The MK IX had a fourth propeller blade but was very similar in appearance to the MK V giving the Luftwaffe Pilots quite a surprise when they came into contact.

MK IX and FW 190 in combat.

Click on the picture to enlarge

MK IX Spitfire

Click on the picture to enlarge

In July 1942 a Spitfire IX was flown in a comparative trial against a Focke-Wulf 190A which had fallen into British hands when its pilot landed by mistake at Pembrey RAF base at in Wales. The trial showed that there was a remarkable similarity in performance. The following are extracts from the official report.

SPITFIRE IX VERSUS FW 190A

The FW190 was compared with a fully operational Spitfire IX for speed and manoeuvrability at heights up to 25,000 feet [7620 metres].

At most heights the Spitfire IX is slightly superior in speed to the FW190 -
the approximate differences in speed are as follows:

At 2,000 ft [610 m] the FW 190 is 7-8 mph [11-13 km/hr] faster than the Spitfire
At 5,000 ft [1524 m] the FW 190 and the Spitfire are approximately the same
At 8,000 ft [2440 m] the Spitfire IX is 8 mph [13 km/hr] faster than the FW 190
At 15,000 ft [4573 m] the Spitfire IX is 5 mph [8 km/hr] faster than the FW 190
At 18,000 ft [5488 m] the FW 190 is 3 mph [5 km/hr] faster than the Spitfire IX
At 21,000 ft [6400 m] the FW 190 and the Spitfire are approximately the same
At 25,000 ft [7622 m] the Spitfire IX is 5-7 mph [8-11 km/hr] faster than the FW 190


Climb: During comparative climbs at various heights up to 23,000 feet [7012 metres], with both aircraft flying under maximum continuous climbing conditions, little difference was found between the two aircraft although on the whole the Spitfire was slightly better.

Above 22,000 feet [6707 m] the climb of the FW 190 is falling off rapidly, whereas the climb of the Spitfire IX is increasing.

Dive: The FW 190 is faster than the Spitfire IX in a dive, particularly during the initial stage. This superiority is not as marked as with the Spitfire VB.

Manoeuvrability: The FW 190 is more manoeuvrable than the Spitfire IX except in turning circles.
The superior rate of roll of the FW 190 enabled it to avoid the Spitfire IX by turning over into a diving turn in the opposite direction.

The Spitfire IX's worst heights for fighting the FW 190 were between 18,000 and 22,000 feet [5486-6707m] and also below 3,000 feet [914m].

The initial acceleration of the FW 190 is better than that of the Spitfire IX under all conditions of flight, except in level flight at altitudes where the Spitfire has a speed advantage.

The general impression of the pilots involved in the trials is that the Spitfire Mark IX compares well with the FW 190. Providing the Spitfire IX has the initiative, it undoubtedly stands a good chance of shooting down the FW 190.

Focke-Wulf 190 Flap 1 1(pg3 air)

Here are four original flaps from a FW 190. These are in good condition , not from a crash sight they were found being used as part of a shed roof and still have the remains of tar on them, this can easily be removed with a suitable solvent. 

They are complete and straight and would be excellent for use in a static restoration.

It possible some parts my be usable for a flying restoration please see the expanded pictures for condition. 

 We have three available and they vary in condition. If you want to buy more than one contact us and we will give you a combined postage quote and a multiple purchase discount.

Click on the picture to enlarge

Overseas buyers contact us for shipping quote

Click on the picture to enlarge

FW flap 2 (Pg Airframe 3 )

£850

Overseas buyers contact us for shipping quote

Click on the picture to enlarge

FW flap 3 (Pg Airframe 3 )

£850

Overseas buyers contact us for shipping quote

Click on the picture to enlarge

£850

FW flap 4 (Pg Airframe 3 )

Overseas buyers contact us for shipping quote

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

 

 

Click on the pictures to enlarge them

It carries an Avro inspectors stamp. R3 680. seen above.

Avro Lancaster Rudder (pg1 relics )

Here is a substantial piece of a Lancaster . It forms part of the rudder on the tail, It measures 2m by 0.7m at its widest point. Looking from the front of the aircraft it is the RHS rudder.

 It was recovered from IJsselmeer, former Zuyderzee in the Netherlands and was purchased by us on a recent buying trip to Holland.. 

 Although still known as the Zuiderzee to the crews, this large inner sea in fact became the IJsselmeer when the Afsluitdijk dyke was finished in 1933. The dyke became a familiar pinpoint to the bomber crews. Having done some research it seems many Lancasters met their fate over the Zuyderzee/ IJsselmeer here is a record of one such loss.

 Aircraft Type: Lancaster
Serial number: ED 357
Radio call sign: PH – S
Unit: ATTD 12 SQN RAF
Summary:
Lancaster ED357 took off from RAF Wickenby at 2240 hours on the night of 11/12th
June 1943 to bomb Dusseldorf, Germany. Nothing was heard from the aircraft after take
off and it failed to return to base.
Crew:
RAAF 409256 Flt Sgt D McN Thomson, Captain (Pilot)
RAF Sgt J L Osborne, (Flight Engineer)
RAF Sgt K Bowes, (Navigator)
RAF Sgt W M Ward, (Bomb Aimer)
RAF Sgt D N Campbell; (Wireless Air Gunner)
RCAF Sgt W T Pingle, (Mid Upper Gunner)
RCAF Sgt C W A Sparling (Rear Gunner)

It was later established that the aircraft crashed into the Ijsselmeer in an area known as
the Oosteelijk-Flevoland polder, near Dronten, Netherlands.
Five of the crew were killed and Sgt Pingle and Sparling were POW’s.
Sgt Sparling later stated “ The aircraft was shot down over the Zuyder Zee and the crew
baled out into the water. I heard the crew calling for help during the night and when I was
picked up the next morning there was no trace of the others. As far as I can ascertain
Thompson must have been drowned. A 3 hours search found no trace.”
Flt Sgt Thomson and Sgt’s Osborne, Ward and Campbell are buried in the Amsterdam
Bew Eastern cemetery, Locality Noordr-Holland, Netherlands. The cemetery is in the
south-eastern district of Amsterdam in Kruislaan, a road in the Wsatergraafsmeer area of
the city.
Sgt Bowes has no known grave and his name is commemorated on the Memorial to the
Missing, Runnymede, Surrey, UK
A propeller from the aircraft now stands in front of the town hall at Dronten, where an
Air Gunners parade is held each year.

Shown under the the left tail; plane and rudder but the construction is visable.

Find this and other Lancaster panels in the relics section

.

Click on the picture to enlarge

 

Click on the picture to enlarge to can see the part number and inspectors stamp.

Original Spitfire panel 1 (pg3 air)

Here we have a substantial original Spitfire panel with original paint, its a dark green with a grey blue colouring. The panel is approximately 3mm thick much thicker than normal skinning.  Measures 0.920 m by 0.720 m at maximum. I  believe its from the top cowing covering the fuel tank. It has several cowling fasteners making it removable for inspection. It was recovered from Holland.

Part number 303 33 20

300= MK 1 although if this part was not modified it could be used on later MKs. With the paint scheme I would suggest its MK IX.

30= Main Fairing

It also carries a VACB inspectors stamp meaning it was made in the main Spitfire factory at Castle Bromwhich.

VACB= Vickers Armstrong Castle Bromwich

Out of Stock More Wanted Contact Us

.Click on the picture to enlarge

 

Original Spitfire panel 2 (pg3 air)

Here is second Spitfire panel from the same aircraft , the metal is the same thickness of the first panel shown above . No part number on this one but definitely from the same aircraft. Probably cut up as scrap at some time in the past.

Measures 0.550m  by 0.430m

 

£200

 

Overseas buyers contact us for shipping quote

 

.

Click on the picture to enlarge

 

£25

Vickers Varsity Airframe Part 1(pg3 air)

Here we have a Part of Airframe From the Vickers Varsity

This has Part Number 6483347

The Varsity was developed by Vickers and based on the Viking and Valetta to meet Air Ministry Specification T.13/48 for a twin-engine training aircraft to replace the Wellington T10 and the Valetta T3 and T4. The main differences were the wider-span wings, longer fuselage and tricycle undercarriage. There was also a ventral pannier to allow a trainee bomb aimer to lie in a prone position and a bomb bay with a capacity for 24 x 25lb smoke & flash bombs. The prototype  first flew from Wisley on 17 July 1949.

Vickers Varsity

 

 

.

Click on the picture to enlarge

Vickers Varsity Airframe Part 2(pg3 air)

Here we have a Part of Airframe From the Vickers Varsity

This has Part Number 64827649

£25

 

.

Click on the picture to enlarge

£25

 

Vickers Varsity Airframe Part 3(pg3 air)

Here we have a Part of Airframe From the Vickers Varsity

This has Part Number 6482169

.

Click on the picture to enlarge

 

Vickers Varsity Airframe Part 4(pg3 air)

Here we have a Part of Airframe From the Vickers Varsity

This has Part Number 64816231

£25

 

.

Click on the picture to enlarge

Vickers Varsity Airframe Part 5(pg3 air)

Here we have a Part of Airframe From the Vickers Varsity

This has Part Number 6488591

£25

 

.

Click on the picture to enlarge

Vickers Varsity Airframe Part 6(pg3 air)

Here we have a Part of Airframe From the Vickers Varsity

This has Part Number 648857 1547

£25

.

Click on the picture to enlarge

Vickers Varsity Airframe Part 7(pg3 air)

Here we have a Radio Mount From the Vickers Varsity

This has Part Number 66853 372A

£25

.

Click on the picture to enlarge

Click on the picture to enlarge Mosquito NT528 Jack Point Cover(pg3 air)

Here we have a Jack point Cover for the DeHavilland Mosquito

This was This was purchased from an Aviation archaeologist on one of our latest trip to Arnhem

This has Part Number L98898A

This has a Aircraft Serial Number NT528 that Corresponds with Mosquito NF Mk.30 from 219 (Mysore) Squadron

The Tyre Bust on Take off and the Plane Swung on Landing and the Undercarriage Failed

It Crashed at Drenthe in Holland on the 28th June 1945

Out of stock

Click on the picture to enlarge

£499

Original Spitfire firewall *(Pg3 air)

Here we have an original Spitfire firewall . Shown left and below how it would once have looked. A rare and recognisable piece of Spitfire with lots of potential for art work or static restoration project.

Click on the picture to enlarge

Click on the picture to enlarge

 

Original Spitfire engine cowling *(Pg3 air)

Here is an original Spitfire engine cowling a large piece great wall hangar or base for artwork.  You can see the position of the cowling above behind the prop and below the exhaust stubs.

£499

Click on the picture to enlarge

£275

Original Spitfire Wing leading edge skin with gun ports *(Pg3 air)

Here is an original Spitfire wing skin from the leading edge with the gun ports a large piece full, of potential as a display item.

Click on the picture to enlarge

You can see its approximate position above.

Click on the picture to enlarge

£375

Original Spitfire lower wing panel with 20mm cannon ejection chute *(Pg3 air)

A large panel giving access to the 20mm cannons with the ejection chute all original great as a pattern or with great potential as a wall hanger for artwork.

Click on the picture to enlarge

The position of the panel can be seen above.

  1 2 3
 

                              

 


 © Copyright 2003.  SpitfireSpares.com.  All Rights Reserved.